Arts

Ask Me Another
3:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Happy And You Know It

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 8:54 am

Jonathan Coulton quizzes contestants on the lost verses of "If You're Happy and You Know It," in which the lyrics hint to certain things. The song should really be re-titled, "If You're An Inanimate Object And You Know It." Clap your hands.

Ask Me Another
3:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Down at Downton Abbey

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 8:54 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's welcome our next two contestants.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Andy Duong and Tom Miller. Welcome to ASK ME ANOTHER, Andy, Tom. So, Andy, you have been to a huge number of countries.

ANDY DUONG: I have.

EISENBERG: How many?

DUONG: Twenty-eight.

EISENBERG: Twenty-eight. Do you have a favorite?

DUONG: The Netherlands actually.

EISENBERG: Oh yeah, yeah, [unintelligible].

DUONG: For many reasons.

EISENBERG: For many reasons? What's your second favorite reason?

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Ask Me Another
3:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Forwards And Backwards

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

(APPLAUSE)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm your host Ophira Eisenberg and with me is puzzler extraordinaire, John Chaneski.

JOHN CHANESKI: Hi, all right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And we have our next contestants, let's welcome Susan Poliniak.

SUSAN POLINIAK: Hello.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Hi. And Ken Stern.

CHANESKI: Ken Stern.

(APPLAUSE)

KEN STERN: Ken Stern.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: So Susan, you actually were, or maybe still are, a puppeteer?

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Ask Me Another
3:42 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Spot the Mistake

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 8:54 am

Don't you just love pointing out when others are wrong? In this game, contestants hear fictitious reports from actual NPR correspondents, and must identify which piece of information is inaccurate. This game is unpossible!

Movies
3:38 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Hooray For Nollywood: Nigerian Distributor Casts Wide Net Online

A typical Nigerian film market in Lagos. Though physical distribution of Nollywood films is booming, the digital market has also grown, thanks to a plugged-in African diaspora.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 4:56 pm

The massively popular Nigerian film industry known as Nollywood started humbly about 20 years ago. Nollywood movies were shot as cheaply and as quickly as possible, then released straight to VHS.

Nollywood caught on globally, and piracy was a major factor in the industry's growth, as copies of copies of Nollywood tapes sold on street corners from Lagos to Harlem. In the early 2000s, Nollywood distribution shifted from VHS to discs — and now, the movies are also beginning to stream online.

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