Arts

Art & Design
10:44 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Styling The NBA

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 11:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. For the end of our program today, we want to talk about two aspects of American style. In a few minutes, we're going to talk about tattoos. They used to be something you got when you went into the Army or to jail, but now they've gone mainstream. We'll talk with a leading tattoo artist about that in just a minute.

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Art & Design
10:44 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Tattoos Still Taboo?

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 11:40 am

America has a love/hate relationship with tattoos, but body ink is becoming more and more mainstream. Host Michel Martin speaks with Fatty, the owner of Fatty's Custom Tattooz in Washington, D.C, about America's fascination with tattoos, and the fading cultural taboos.

On Point
8:00 am
Wed May 22, 2013

On Point: Job Hunting

This week Chancellor Kent Hance offers tips about job hunting, how to interview and why you should always be ready for anything!

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Book News: Newly Found Pearl Buck Novel To Be Published This Fall

At her desk in the study of her Philadelphia townhouse in 1967, Pearl Buck looks at a bound volume of the magazine Asia from 1925 that contained her first published work.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed May 22, 2013

A Different Kind Of Immigrant Experience In 'Americanah'

PIUS UTOMI EKPEI AFP/Getty Images

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's fourth book, Americanah, is so smart about so many subjects that to call it a novel about being black in the 21st century doesn't even begin to convey its luxurious heft and scope. Americanah is indeed a novel about being black in the 21st century — in America, Great Britain and Africa, while answering a want ad, choosing a lover, hailing a cab, eating collard greens, watching Barack Obama on television — but you could also call it a novel of immigration and dislocation, just about every page tinged with faint loneliness.

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