Arts

Books
4:01 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

Last Chance To Submit For Round 10 Of Three-Minute Fiction

You have until 11:59 p.m. ET Sunday to send in your original short fiction. The challenge this round is to write a story in the form of a voice mail message. Submit your story here: https://npr3mf.submittable.com/submit

Author Interviews
2:28 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

Small Objects Reveal 'The Real Jane Austen'

Harper Collins

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 3:58 pm

Flotsam and Jetsam: of such things are stories made. Writers use objects to give their stories weight, attachment and verisimilitude, like Gary Paulsen's The Hatchet; Jean Shepherd's Red Ryder BB Gun inspired A Christmas Story; and how about Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon?

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You Must Read This
6:03 am
Sun February 10, 2013

The Splendor Of Suffering In 'The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne'

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 7:16 am

Ann Leary's latest book is The Good House.

I tend to read funny books when I'm happy and tragic books when I'm sad, but when I'm truly depressed, when I want to be fully immersed in the horrible splendor of the most desperate human suffering, I always return to Brian Moore's The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne.

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Author Interviews
5:36 am
Sun February 10, 2013

'House Girl' Ties Past To Present In Tale Of Art And Slavery

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 8:26 am

On a Virginia plantation in 1852, a young house slave tends to her ailing mistress, creates exquisite paintings and plans her escape. In 2004 New York, an ambitious young lawyer works night and day on the biggest case of her promising career.

Tara Conklin's debut novel, The House Girl, intertwines these women's narratives in a story of art and injustice.

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Sunday Puzzle
11:08 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

The Answer Lies Within

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 5:36 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a three-letter word that ends a familiar two-word phrase. You will be given the first word of the phrase. You provide the three-letter word that ends it. And the three letters in your answer will always be found, in some order, inside the first word. For example, given "Arctic," you would say "Air."

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