Arts

Europe
2:50 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Letters Of Heartbreak Find Some Love In Verona, Italy

The Juliet Club (Club di Giulietta) mailbox in Verona, Italy. Volunteers answer by hand every single letter that the club receives.
Courtesy of the Juliet Club

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:55 pm

Each year, the town of Verona, Italy — home of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet — receives thousands of letters of heartache and unrequited love addressed to the play's star-crossed heroine.

The tradition of sending letters to Juliet very likely goes back centuries. People started by leaving notes on a local landmark said to be Juliet's tomb. Later, many started sending mail directly to the city. By the 1990s, Verona was receiving so many letters, it created an office to deal with it. And each letter — the Juliet Club office gets more than 6,000 a year — is answered by hand.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
5:25 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Following The Yellow Brick Road Back To The Origins Of 'Oz'

W.W. Norton

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 4:24 pm

It's safe to say that most Americans are familiar with the classic film featuring a stumbling Scarecrow, a rusted Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion and Dorothy, played by actress Judy Garland, clad in gingham and braids.

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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Granta's 'Best Of Young British Novelists' Shows A 'Disunited Kingdom'

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 6:36 pm

Once every decade, the literary magazine Granta publishes an issue called "Best of Young British Novelists," with short excerpts from the novels of 20 emerging authors. In the past, the list of names has proved unusually prescient, with authors such as Salman Rushdie, Martin Amis and Zadie Smith featured before they were widely read.

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Movies
3:24 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

On The Big Screen, The Tax Guy Can Be Your Buddy

The paying and collecting of taxes might not be the sexiest plot point in an industry that depends on sizzle. But that doesn't mean revenuers haven't made their mark on screen.
Airyelf iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:02 pm

It's fair to say that the bakery employees who hooted and jeered "tax maaaaaan" when mild-mannered auditor Will Ferrell showed up in Stranger than Fiction were no fans of the Internal Revenue Service. In that, they're like a lot of us, no?

So it's intriguing that Hollywood generally treats tax inspectors as nice guys. On the big screen, it's typically their IRS bosses who are the bad ones.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

2013 Pulitzers Honor Sharon Olds, Adam Johnson, New York Times

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 8:37 am

The new batch of Pulitzer Prize winners has just been announced, with novelist Adam Johnson winning the fiction prize with The Orphan Master's Son. The winners of the prizes for Americans' best work in journalism, drama, music, and writing also receive a $10,000 cash award.

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