Arts

Arts & Life
11:02 am
Wed April 10, 2013

Listener Muses About Her Miracle Bra And Medical Exam

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And next, the latest in our series, Muses and Metaphor. We're celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing your poetic tweets. We've been hearing your poems that are 140 characters or less. We call our series Muses and Metaphor.

Today's poem comes from Christina Lux of Lawrence, Kansas. She's the assistant director of the African Studies Center at the University of Kansas. Our series curator, Holly Bass, says this tweet reminded her of how poetry can help us sort out difficult emotions and share personal pain. Here it is.

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Monkey See
9:51 am
Wed April 10, 2013

Thank G-O-O-D-N-E-S-S: The National Spelling Bee Adds Meaning

Spellers wait to participate in the semi-finals of the 2011 Scripps National Spelling Bee.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

As Eyder Peralta reported last night, the National Spelling Bee has made a big change to its rules.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
8:05 am
Wed April 10, 2013

Witches And Wizards: A Scrapbook From The Land Of Oz

Middle and high school girls participate in the Dorothy's House and Land of Oz program in Liberal, Kan.
JoAnne Mansell

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 1:33 pm

The Yellow Brick Road is a well-traveled one; generations of young readers have followed L. Frank Baum's path to the magical Land of Oz. This spring, as members of NPR's Backseat Book Club embarked on their own journeys to the Emerald City, we asked you to share your Oz memories and photos with us. Here's a sampling of what we received.

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The Two-Way
6:27 am
Wed April 10, 2013

Book News: New Editor Named At 'New York Times Book Review'

The New York Times sign is displayed in front of the newspaper's midtown headquarters in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed April 10, 2013

From Cincinnati To North Korea, We All Wake Up 'Lonely'

When Fiona Maazel published her first novel, Last Last Chance, in 2008, her frenetic imagination and sharply etched characters earned her a spot on the National Book Foundation's 5 Under 35 authors list. Her 29-year-old narrator, Lucy, was heading into her seventh stretch in rehab; Maazel filtered her addiction, grief, self-involvement and fear through a scrim of dark humor.

There's a comic overlay to her second, even more frenzied and inventive novel, Woke Up Lonely. But the tilt toward pathos is stronger.

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