Arts

Television
2:18 am
Fri April 5, 2013

As Audiences Shift To Cable, TV Programming Changes, Too

In recent years, high-profile cable TV dramas like AMC's Mad Men have helped to shift audiences and programming across all types of TV networks. (Pictured, from left: John Slattery, Jon Hamm and Vincent Kartheiser)
Michael Yarish / AMC

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 12:20 pm

Mad Men comes back for its sixth season Sunday at an opportune moment for basic cable. Last weekend, 25 million viewers combined watched The Bible and The Walking Dead on basic cable channels. That's more than triple the audience for The Good Wife on CBS that same night.

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Monkey See
5:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Remembering Roger Ebert

Film critic Roger Ebert, seen here in 2009, died Thursday.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:37 am

There's always been Roger Ebert. And when I read that he had died Thursday, that's what caught in my throat. Not just sadness, but bafflement. I don't understand. There's always been Roger Ebert.

This will be the first night in my life I go to bed and he's not out there thinking about movies. And perhaps it's an odd description of sadness, but: It's weird.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Trance': Crime Pays, If You Remember Where The Stash Is

Franck (Vincent Cassel), Simon (James McAvoy) and Elizabeth (Rosario Dawson) are uneasy allies trying to discover exactly what went wrong during a botched art heist in Danny Boyle's trippy thriller Trance.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

The rampant trippiness of Danny Boyle's movies is what makes them so enjoyable — and, sometimes, so annoying.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Before And After' Dinner, Andre Is Still Talking

In his wife's new documentary, theatrical director Andre Gregory comes across as an eternal child, hooked on his capacity to enchant but rarely able to listen to anyone else.
Cinema Guild

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:27 pm

In 1981, avant-garde theater director Andre Gregory collaborated with his friend Wallace Shawn and French filmmaker Louis Malle on an oddball project they called My Dinner with Andre.

Now enshrined as a classic — and one of the most-lampooned films in the history of American cinema — the movie is a talky two-hander in which Gregory (or someone very like him) gassed away about his globe-trotting adventures in spiritual enlightenment, while Shawn (or someone very like him) listened in disbelief, then grew entranced.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Teapot' Jackpot? Newlyweds Feel Fiscal Hurt In Dark Comedy

Temple gives Alice a sharp edge, but the character's persona wears thin by the end of the film.
Angela Graves Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 5:05 pm

In theory, it's romantic to watch young couples struggling. We're used to seeing 'em in movies from the '30s, '40s and onward: He makes only enough money to put beans, not steak, on the table. She stretches the meager dollars he brings home by whipping up cheerful curtains patched together from fabric scraps. They may be poor, but they have love on their side, and if they work together, a comfortable and happy life — including the babies that will eventually come — will be theirs.

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