Arts

Author Interviews
12:33 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

'Angry Days' Shows An America Torn Over Entering World War II

Before Pearl Harbor, aviator Charles Lindbergh was so vocal about his opposition to U.S. involvement in World War II that he became an unofficial leader of America's isolationist movement.
AP

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 2:30 pm

During the debate over whether to invade Iraq, or whether to stay in Afghanistan, many people looked back to World War II, describing it as a good and just war — a war the U.S. knew it had to fight. In reality, it wasn't that simple. When Britain and France went to war with Germany in 1939, Americans were divided about offering military aid, and the debate over the U.S. joining the war was even more heated. It wasn't until two years later, when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and Germany declared war against the U.S., that Americans officially entered the conflict.

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Monkey See
11:37 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Tweaks, Retooling, And When To Give Up: A Tale Of Two Singing Shows

Adam Levine, Shakira, Usher, and Blake Shelton make up the adjusted judging panel on NBC's The Voice.
Adam Taylor NBC

As The Voice returns to NBC this week for its fourth season, viewers are seeing two new, if quite familiar, faces as Shakira and Usher occupy the coaches' seats vacated by Christina Aguilera and Cee Lo Green. Its talent-show rival over on Fox, The X Factor, will also see two new judges when (if? no, "when," surely) it comes back in the fall.

So why does The Voice seem so healthy and The X Factor so wobbly?

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The Salt
11:23 am
Tue March 26, 2013

An Oral History Of New York Food: Dining Out Wasn't Always 'In'

A pushcart fruit vendor at the Fulton fish market in New York City in 1943
Gordon Parks Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 10:42 am

As Marcel Proust so famously documented, it's often the simplest of foods that can carry us back to remembrances of things past.

And so perhaps it's not so surprising that, when freelance food writer Anne Noyes Saini began asking New York's elderly residents about their memories of the foods of the city during the early- to mid-20th century, it was humble meals like baked beans and the fruits sold by old-timey wagons that most often came to mind.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Book News: Wis. Governor Takes Heat Over His Choice Of Ghostwriter

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks during the Republican National Convention on Aug. 28, 2012.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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First Reads
6:03 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Exclusive First Read: Meg Wolitzer's 'The Interestings'

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:20 am

  • Listen to the Excerpt

Meg Wolitzer returns with The Interestings, a big and deliciously complicated novel that follows a group of summer-camp friends through the decades. Jules, Ash, Ethan and Jonah first dubbed themselves "the Interestings" as teenagers in the sweltering confines of Boys Teepee 3 at the artsy camp Spirit-in-the-Woods. All of them are bright, talented kids — artists, musicians, actors — but what happens to close friendship and early promise when you grow up? For the Interestings, that question will have very different answers.

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