Arts

Author Interviews
2:16 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

'Crushing Eastern Europe' Behind The 'Iron Curtain'

Courtesy of Doubleday

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:47 pm

If you read Anne Applebaum's Iron Curtain as a manual on how to take over a state and turn it totalitarian, the first lesson, she says, would be on targeted violence. Applebaum's book, which was recently nominated for a National Book Award, describes how after World War II, the Soviet Union found potential dissidents everywhere.

"It really meant anybody who had a leadership role in society," she tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "This included priests, people who had been politicians, people who had been merchants before the war, and people who ran youth groups."

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Monkey See
11:40 am
Thu November 8, 2012

The Love You Save: Lessons On Water And Stuff

This is the poster from my mom. As you can see, I was very into writing about reality shows.
Linda Holmes

On Monday morning at about 5:30 (I'm an early riser), I woke up, swung my legs out of bed, and stepped into water.

I live in a basement apartment where I've been for four years, and almost exactly a week after I was blessedly lucky to avoid the superstorm — and at a time when some of my New York and New Jersey friends were still in the dark — a freaky plumbing/heating mishap wound up filling my entire apartment with about an inch of water.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Going 'Marbles': From Manic Highs To Oceanic Lows

Gotham

Marbles, cartoonist Ellen Forney's excellent graphic memoir about being bipolar, opens with her in the middle of a 5 1/2-hour session in a tattoo parlor. Every time the needle traces a line, Forney writes, she can "see the sensation — a bright white light, an electrical charge." Those opening words are a perfect description of her book. From the very first page, Forney allows us to see sensation — to inhabit, as closely as possible, her bipolar world, from its manic, exhilarating highs to its oceanic, debilitating lows.

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Author Interviews
2:04 pm
Wed November 7, 2012

Ornstein: Could A Second Term Mean More Gridlock?

Basic Books

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 12:00 pm

President Obama has been re-elected. Democrats and Republicans have maintained their respective majorities in the Senate and in the House. So does this mean there will be more partisan gridlock?

Norm Ornstein, a writer for Roll Call and a resident scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that it's a mixed message.

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The Salt
1:07 pm
Wed November 7, 2012

Meet 4 African Women Who Are Changing The Face Of Coffee

Fatima Aziz Faraji is one of four women who is at the forefront of empowering women in the coffee sector.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 2:39 pm

If you're a coffee drinker, chances are the cup of java you drank this morning was made from beans that were produced or harvested by women. Women's handprints can be found at every point in coffee production.

In fact, on family-owned coffee farms in Africa, about 70 percent of maintenance and harvesting work is done by women, according to an analysis by the International Trade Centre, but only rarely do women own the land or have financial control.

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