Vultures Land On K Street

Jun 5, 2014

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. There's a certain kind of news story for which you simply must rely on The Washington Post. This is that story. The Post published pictures of vultures on K Street. Washingtonians know K Street as the classic address for Washington lobbyists. A Post reporter got one punch line after another when asking passersby what they thought of vultures roosting on a K Street rooftop, like the bird variety. And that sounds appropriate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the U.S. military is saying very little about Sergeant Bergdahl's condition now that he's in a military hospital in Germany. Army leaders have said that once he is determined to be healthy, they will investigate the circumstances of his capture and whether he broke any military laws and should be prosecuted. For more, we're joined in our studio by NPR Pentagon correspondent, Tom Bowman. Tom, good morning.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the swap for Bergdahl prompted many people to recall a truism about American foreign-policy. The line is that America does not negotiate with terrorists, a principle that seemed to have been violated here.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In fact, that truism has not often been true. America has negotiated with terrorists and so have other governments.

The Senate votes Thursday on the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell to be Health and Human Services Secretary, replacing Kathleen Sebelius. Burwell was running the Office of Management and Budget.

The stadium where the opening game of the World Cup will be played is a gleaming monument to the world's favorite sport, soccer. The Corinthians Arena — named after one of Brazil's most famous teams, which will take it over — has been built from scratch and boasts a massive LCD screen and state-of-the-art facilities.

Last weekend, it was full of fans watching the last test match before the World Cup begins. It was supposed to be a sort of final run-through to make sure everything is ready and working.

Except it wasn't.

This week marks the one-year anniversary of the Snowden revelations. Whatever you may think about Edward Snowden the man — is he a traitor or a hero? — one fact is indisputable. His leaks shook the U.S. technology industry to its core. And the reverberations keep on coming.

Take Cisco. The Silicon Valley giant is now at risk of losing its once-stellar reputation with foreign customers — at the exact same moment it needs to grow abroad.

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You normally hear Los Angeles Times and Morning Edition film critic Kenneth Turan reviewing new movies, but this week, we're talking about old films with him instead. That's because he's written a new book called Not to Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film. In it, he offers up tidbits of Hollywood history and behind-the-scenes drama, as well as his critical analysis of some of the world's greatest movies — some familiar, some obscure.

It's a writer's fantasy. You author a book. It hits the young adult jackpot. It sells 10 million copies. Hollywood actors fight for parts in the movie.

Welcome to John Green's reality. Not too long ago, in New York City, he introduced a screening of the film based on his novel, The Fault in Our Stars, to an audience of hundreds of teenagers ecstatically screaming his name. They cried copiously throughout the film, which follows a romance between two teenagers with cancer.

Big, bold wines have their fans. But with the arrival of summer, make room for a bumper crop of lighter, more subtle wines.

"Low-alcohol wines are super hot right now," says wine writer Katherine Cole.

There's Txakoli, or Txakolina, wines from the Basque region of Spain, Rieslings from Germany and New York state, and Vinho Verde from Portugal, to name a few.

These wines typically hover in the 9 percent to 11 percent alcohol range. This compares to about 13 percent to 14 percent in a typical California chardonnay.

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