When Willie Nelson was a young hustler selling songs to Patsy Cline's people, he probably never thought he'd become the crowd-anointed sage of country music. But that's what happened as the Redheaded Stranger went gray, turned smoking weed into a brand and a virtue, and produced a discography that added up to its own American Songbook.

Popcaan is something of an unlikely hero in the world of dancehall. He grew up in the Jamaican projects without becoming a hard-edged "rude boy." And he's neither crooner nor spitfire MC — instead, he stands happily between those extremes. The deejay's debut album, Where We Come From, is equal parts dancefloor anthems and "conscious" tunes about Jamaican life, unified by breezy, fresh production from Brooklyn's Dre Skull.

Most of the time, I just pick songs with moments that get me air drumming, regardless of the genre or drummer — or the programmer behind the beats. But for this week's puzzler, I've selected works by undeniable legends in the business, from classic rock pioneers to jazz virtuosos. Good luck, heroes!

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The first game of the NBA finals was a scorcher. Yes, it was played indoors – but the air conditioning in San Antonio's arena broke down, leaving the host Spurs and the Miami Heat sweating in 90-degree temperatures. The Spurs overcame the heat, and the Heat, 110-95.

In 1944, Jim Martin parachuted onto the coast of Normandy a night ahead of the D-Day invasion. He says this time he wasn't scared because no one was shooting at him.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a test of the limits of free expression. Arizona's Maricopa Association of Governments ordered Dianne Barker to stop performing cartwheels at public meetings. She's 65 and apparently good at them. She does cartwheels to promote the benefits of walking. An attorney has written her demanding that she stop this disruptive practice but she has insisted she has a...

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, here we go, Steve. Woohoo.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news - veterans and world leaders, today, are marking the 70th anniversary of D-Day and World War II. Thousands of U.S., British, and Canadian and French troops rode landing craft toward Normandy, France in 1944 and splashed up the beaches while under heavy fire.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As they began the liberation of Europe, many heard a radio broadcast by their supreme commander, Dwight Eisenhower.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tomorrow is a big day in horse racing - the Belmont Stakes, the last race in the Triple Crown. California Chrome has a chance to complete the Triple Crown for the first time in 36 years, having already won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness, of course. That's the excitement in the foreground. In the background, a quiet war is raging. Charles Lane, of member station WSHU, reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF KENTUCKY DERBY)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: (Yelling) But California Chrome shines bright in the Kentucky Derby.

Well-heeled outside groups easily outspent Sen. Thad Cochran and challenger Chris McDaniel before the GOP Senate primary in Mississippi. They're going all in on the runoff election later this month.

A couple of years ago, film director and writer John Waters decided to hitchhike alone from his Baltimore home to his apartment in San Francisco — and see what happened. The so-called Pope of Trash — the man behind the films Pink Flamingos and Cry-Baby — managed to get many rides — 21 in all. He chronicles his cross-country adventure in a new book called Carsick.

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