StoryCorps
2:02 am
Fri June 21, 2013

For A Boy With Little, Learning To Love A Castoff Trombone

On a visit to StoryCorps in Phoenix, Gilbert Zermeno told his wife, Pat Powers-Zermeno, about what it was like to grow up poor while yearning to join the school band.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 9:57 am

Gilbert Zermeno came from a big family who didn't have much. They lived on the plains of West Texas and got by on the $100 a week that Gilbert's father made working the cotton fields.

So when Gilbert wanted to join the school band in sixth grade, his parents had to get creative, as he explained to his wife, Pat Powers-Zermeno, during a recent visit to StoryCorps in Phoenix.

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Movie Reviews
12:00 am
Fri June 21, 2013

For Pixar's 'Monsters,' A Sophomore Slump

For Billy Crystal's Mike, the big green eyeball of Monsters University, scaring hardly comes naturally.
Pixar

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 11:27 am

It's a big month for origin stories: first the Man of Steel, now the Eye of Green and the Abominable Furball of Blue — aka Mike and Sully, top scarers at Monsters, Inc. How did they become the best of the best, you ask? You didn't ask? Well, Pixar's got the answer anyway: They trained at Monsters U.

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Movie Reviews
11:11 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'World War Z': When Going Viral Isn't Such A Good Thing

Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) puts his past as a U.N. investigator to work again when he and his family — not to mention the rest of the planet — are threatened by a zombie apocalypse.
Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 10:09 am

World War Z is clearly out to make a buck — and needs to, since with its well-publicized overruns, rewrites and production delays, it looks to have cost gazillions in screenwriter salaries alone — but for its first hour or so, you'd never guess this sprawling contagion epic had anything on its mind but action storytelling.

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The Salt
6:04 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

How Circadian Rhythms Give Vegetables A Healthy Boost

Researchers at Rice University conducted lab studies using light-dark cycles to try to coax more beneficial compounds out of fruits and vegetables.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 3:56 pm

Just as we have internal clocks that help regulate the systems in our bodies, fruit and vegetable plants have circadian rhythms, too.

And a new study published in Current Biology finds there may be a way to boost some of the beneficial compounds in plants by simulating the light-dark cycle after crops are harvested.

So, how does it work?

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History
5:42 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

The Desegregation Of Birmingham's Golf Courses

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. All this week, I'm in Birmingham, Alabama, where the city is in the midst of commemorating the 50th anniversary of the tumultuous and influential civil rights protests that occurred here. One place that might not come to mind when you think about this period is the golf course.

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The Salt
5:05 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

House Smacks Down Farm Bill, And Farm Lobby, Too

Gracie Shannon-Sanborn, 5, holds a sign as she joins her father Allen Sanborn (L) and members of Progressive Democrats of America at a rally in front of Rep. Henry Waxman's office on June 17, 2013 in Los Angeles, Calif. The protestors asked the congressman to vote against a House farm bill, which was defeated Thursday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:16 pm

The so-called farm bill came to the floor of the House of Representatives Thursday. And it crashed. The defeat shocked many observers, but the vote wasn't even particularly close: 234-195. (You can see how your own representative voted here.)

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Why The Immigration Fight Seems Like The NBA Finals

The final outcome of the congressional fight over immigration will be as unpredictable as the result of Game 6 of the NBA Finals.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 5:57 pm

Maybe Game 6 of the NBA Finals has something to teach us about how to watch the immigration debate now taking place in Congress.

Game 6, of course, was the instant sports classic in which the defending champion Miami Heat made an improbable comeback to tie their series with the San Antonio Spurs, three games apiece.

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Code Switch
4:55 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Stuff You Might Have Missed In The Paula Deen Brouhaha

Celebrity chef Paula Deen poses for a portrait on Jan. 17, 2012, in New York. In her deposition for a lawsuit by a former employee, Deen admits to having used racial slurs, among other things.
Carlo Allegri AP

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 4:24 pm

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Book Reviews
4:47 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'Crazy Rich Asians': Lives Of The .0001 Percent

The Venetian Macao, the world's biggest casino by gaming tables, opened to the public in 2007.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 5:42 pm

It's impossible to open the newspaper or turn on the TV these days without seeing some outrageous example of new Asian money. From a castle modeled on Versailles in Changsha to billion-dollar penthouses in Bombay to the Marina Bay Sands casino in Singapore, with its seven celebrity-chef restaurants, the inescapable truth looms before us: We Asians are not just rich but also, frankly, somewhat crazy.

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Television
4:31 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

'Dome' Luck: On CBS, A Drama About Getting Stuck With Each Other

In the wake of the dome's mysterious appearance, the townspeople are cut off from access to TV, phones and the Internet, and must make do with the people and objects they have at their disposal.
CBS

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 3:55 pm

One of the most anticipated shows of the summer, Under the Dome, starts Monday on CBS. It's about a tiny New England town that's suddenly and mysteriously sealed off by an impenetrable dome.

The series is the first on-screen collaboration between two of the biggest Steves in popular culture — Steven Spielberg and Stephen King.

"The Steven Squared, we call it," cracks Neal Baer, an executive producer of the show.

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