Middle East
5:32 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Conflict In Syria Continues To Degrade

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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National Security
5:32 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Civil Liberties Group Concerned Over NSA Programs

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The news that the National Security Agency is collecting reams of telephone data and tracking Internet behavior has alarmed civil liberties groups. President Obama believes U.S. citizens have no need to worry.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: One of the things that we're going to have to discuss and debate is how are we striking this balance between the need to keep the American people safe and our concerns about privacy, because there are some tradeoffs involved.

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Business
5:32 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Restaurants Face Unique Challenges Under Obamacare

Clyde's of Georgetown, part of the 14-restaurant Clyde's Restaurant Group, is just one of many restaurants trying to navigate the changes the Affordable Care Act will bring.
Courtesy of Clyde's Restaurant Group

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Almost 20 percent of American workers are working part-time, a historic high. Those part-time workers will be able to get health coverage beginning next year under Obama's Affordable Care Act, but many business owners worry about how they'll pay for it.

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Theater
5:32 am
Sat June 8, 2013

In Middlebury, Vt., Teens Train For Careers In The 'A.R.T.'s

Bowen Abbey works on a mask for a student production at the Addison Repertory Theater, or A.R.T., in Middlebury, Vt.
Jess Kroll Courtesy Julie Burstein

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Throughout the entertainment industry, alumni of a tiny, vocational high school program are at work: building sets in Hollywood, mixing sound on Broadway, performing on TV shows like The Office. They're graduates of the Addison Repertory Theater (A.R.T.), an incubator for actors and theater technicians at the Hannaford Career Center in Middlebury, Vt.

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Author Interviews
5:32 am
Sat June 8, 2013

'Joker' Asks: Have You Heard The One About The Joke-Telling Poet?

The Joker cover

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Heard any really good jokes lately? Andrew Hudgins is one of America's most noted poets, but he says he has a hard time recalling any actual lines of poetry. He can, however, recite knock-knock jokes he heard in the third grade. Ever since then, he has favored the kind of humor that can make people squirm or even make them angry. Jokes about religion, race, sex, weight, the O.J. Simpson case, Natalie Wood's death, and punch lines from Adolf Hitler's generals — everything is fair game.

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Arts & Life
5:32 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Box Set Showcases Richard Pryor's Difficult, Spontaneous, Hilarious Life

In this 1982 performance, comedian Richard Pryor makes fun of his well-known difficulties with cocaine.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Richard Pryor occupies his own special category in comedy. He played Las Vegas and made popular movies, and performed routines that were almost short stories — searing, profane and moving.

Pryor grew up in his grandmother's brothel in Peoria, Ill.; she beat him, too. He was expelled from high school and enlisted in the U.S. Army, but spent much of his military stint in prison. And with a special fever of genius — torched by drugs, fueled by grief and enlivened by exhilaration — he created unforgettable depictions of what it's like to feel left out of American life.

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Code Switch
4:55 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Fifty Years Later, 'A Better Chance' Trains Young Scholars

Sylvester Monroe and then-wife Regina at his graduation from Harvard University in 1973.
Courtesy of Sylvester Monroe

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Fifty-five boys — all poor and almost all African-American — were a part of a bold educational experiment in the early 1960s. They were placed in an intensive summer school program. If they finished, the headmasters of 16 prep schools agreed to accept them. Tuition paid.

Planning for that experiment started in 1963 at the height of the civil rights movement, one year before President Lyndon B. Johnson declared his "War on Poverty." Today, what began with 55 students and 16 schools has become an institution celebrating its 50th anniversary. It's called "A Better Chance."

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Music Interviews
4:26 am
Sat June 8, 2013

Aoife O'Donovan: Digging Up Musical 'Fossils'

Aoife O'Donovan's first solo album is called Fossils.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 9:12 am

Alison Krauss recorded "Lay My Burden Down" a couple of years ago for her No. 1 country album Paper Airplane, but the song was written by Aoife O'Donovan. The singer, best known as the voice of the alt-bluegrass band Crooked Still, is releasing her first solo album this week.

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News
4:25 am
Sat June 8, 2013

NSA Scandal Looms Over Obama's Talks With China's Xi

President Obama walks with Chinese President Xi Jinping at a retreat on Friday in Rancho Mirage, Calif., where the two leaders are meeting for talks.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

President Obama always intended to talk about spying this weekend. But not like this.

He's getting to know China's new leader at a sprawling estate in the Southern California desert this weekend, but domestic controversies have followed him there.

The president veered off his talking points Friday to spend more than 10 minutes defending a pair of massive surveillance operations that the media recently disclosed.

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It's All Politics
4:25 am
Sat June 8, 2013

WWII Vets Have All But Vanished From The Halls Of Congress

Military pallbearers carry the coffin of the late New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg into the Senate chamber on Thursday. He was the only remaining World War II veteran in the Senate.
Douglas Graham AP

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:39 am

Sen. Frank Lautenberg was buried with military honors at Arlington National Cemetery on Friday. There was a steady rain. Soldiers fired rifle volleys, a bugler played taps and mourners paid their final respects.

The New Jersey Democrat was 89 when he died this week — and his death marked a somber milestone.

For the first time since the end of World War II, there are no veterans of that war in the U.S. Senate. Lautenberg had been the only one remaining.

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