The Two-Way
6:08 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Dozen People Said To Be Under Investigation In Boston Probe

This image from a surveillance video helped investigators identify Tamerlan Tsarnaev (in black cap) and his brother, Dzhokhar (in white cap), as the main suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 9:38 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: Dina Temple-Raston reports

The investigation into the April 15 bombings at the Boston Marathon is widening, with authorities looking at about a dozen people to see whether they might have helped the two main suspects either before or after the attack, law enforcement officials familiar with the probe tell NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

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Poetry
6:03 am
Tue April 30, 2013

A Cartoon Tribute To Cats, And The Poets Who Loved Them

Francesco Marciuliano

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 3:08 pm

Tuesday marks the close of National Poetry Month, a 30-day celebration of all things versified and all people versifying. And in tangentially related news, for more than eight months, a book of cat-themed poetry — I Could Pee On This — has perched on the NPR best-seller lists. There it sits, insouciantly swishing its tail amid self-help books and memoirs, the poetry world's sole representative on the list.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue April 30, 2013

'Daily Rituals' Of The Brilliantly Creative

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 10:33 am

The Onion published an essay recently called "Find The Thing You're Most Passionate About, Then Do It On Nights And Weekends For The Rest Of Your Life."The piece was satire, but it's how many of us respond to the question Mason Currey raises in his entertaining new book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. "How do you do meaningful creative work," he wonders, "while also earning a living?"

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Television
5:11 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Comedian Gets Her Own TV Show: 'Inside Amy Schumer'

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 10:19 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Most of what our next guest says on stage can't be played on the radio. Comedian Amy Schumer talks about sex, a lot. She started performing stand-up in 2004. Now she has a sketch comedy show premiering tonight on Comedy Central.

Amy Schumer's work may not be family-friendly. But as our colleague David Greene learned, her family is at the heart of why she's doing what she does.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Amy Schumer, thanks so much for coming on the program and being with us.

AMY SCHUMER: Who is this? I'm just kidding.

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A Blog Supreme
5:03 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Meet The Man Who Assembles The World's Biggest Jazz Concert

John Beasley has now served as music director for both editions of International Jazz Day.
Tim Sassoon Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 11:40 am

The pianist and composer John Beasley has one of the most formidable tasks of anyone associated with today's International Jazz Day, the celebration produced by UNESCO and the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. He's music director of the centerpiece concert to be live-streamed from Istanbul tonight (2 p.m. ET in the U.S.).

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Virgin Galactic Reaches Milestone In Space Tourism Industry

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 10:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The billionaire Richard Branson is happy this morning. His Virgin Galactic spacecraft successfully completed its first rocket-powered test flight.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: Branson's high flying endeavor has been plagued with delays and technical problems, but on Monday, after an early morning flight from the California desert, the often flamboyant billionaire said history was being made.

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Sanford, Colbert Busch Clash In Sole Debate Before Special Election

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 2:27 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There's a high profile congressional race going on in South Carolina and last night the two candidates met in their first - and only - debate. For the Republican, former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford. This is an attempted political comeback, but it's being hindered by new allegations by his ex-wife that reminds some voters of how Sanford left office in the first place.

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Advocates Honor LaHood's Time At Transportation Department

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 2:27 pm

As outgoing Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood prepares to hand off the baton to President Obama's nominee, Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx, Morning Edition reflects on Lahood's legacy. What have he and the president accomplished? What's still to be done?

National Security
2:20 am
Tue April 30, 2013

U.S. Faces Fight At Intersection Of Crime And Extremism

Gen. Antonio Indjai (left), Guinea-Bissau's army chief of staff, at the funeral of the country's late president, Malam Bacai Sanha, on Jan. 15, 2012. The U.S. says Indjai has been involved in drug trafficking, an allegation he denies. He recently eluded a U.S. sting operation that led to the capture of other officials from his country.
Mamadu Alfa Balde AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 2:27 pm

A suspected drug kingpin from the tiny West African nation of Guinea-Bissau was captured on the high seas by agents from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency earlier this month, brought to Manhattan and is now awaiting trial.

The dramatic sting operation sheds light on what officials say is a growing national security threat: criminal networks teaming up with extremist organizations.

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Author Interviews
2:20 am
Tue April 30, 2013

'Wonderful Words' In Willa Cather's No-Longer-Secret Letters

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 2:27 pm

Willa Cather is one of America's greatest literary voices. Most notably, her stories of immigrant farmers in Nebraska are intimate windows into the lives that make up a greater history of American settlement and struggle.

Cather was also a pioneering female writer in a literary world run by men, and a driven businesswoman — meticulous about every detail of her work, down to the very design of a book jacket. And when she died in 1947, she left a will forbidding the adaptation of her works to theater or film and the publication of her personal letters.

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