The Two-Way
11:50 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Violence Hits Guantanamo Bay, As Inmates Continue Hunger Strikes

A view of the the U.S. Naval Station base in Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Guards and prisoners fought Saturday, as inmates were moved into individual cells instead of communal housing.
Suzette Laboy AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 12:06 pm

Inmates fought guards at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after military authorities decided to end communal housing in one of the prison's camps, and instead put prisoners in individual cells. At least one detainee was reportedly injured by a rubber bullet in the clash Saturday.

The violence began after the facility's commander ordered the move Saturday morning. According to the U.S. Southern Command, the decision was made after detainees covered windows and surveillance cameras, limiting guards' ability to monitor them at all times.

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The Salt
11:03 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Junior League Cookbooks: Crowdsourced Recipes, Old-School Style

"Tea-Time at the Masters" is a popular Junior League of Augusta cookbook first published in 1977. It's now in its 17th reprint.
Courtesy of The Association of Junior Leagues International

The Masters Tournament — you think golf, we think food.

Well, now we think food because this week we were tipped off to a cookbook created for the storied tournament in Augusta, Ga.

The Junior League of Augusta, a women's volunteer and civic organization, published Tea-Time at the Masters back in 1977, but it's still in print.

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Music
10:49 am
Sun April 14, 2013

On The Road With Dawes, The Band Behind The Band

The country rock band Dawes has built a grassroots following opening for other bands. As they release their third album, Stories Don't End, they're preparing to tour with their biggest headliner yet: Bob Dylan. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks two members of Dawes, singer and guitarist Taylor Goldsmith and keyboardist Tay Strathairn, about life on the road.

The Two-Way
10:30 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Police Sergeant Says Trayvon Martin Shooting Targets Were A Training Aid

An image taken from fired police sergeant Ron King's video statement, in which he defends himself for bringing silhouette targets resembling the hoody-wearing image of Trayvon Martin.
YouTube

A police sergeant in Port Canaveral, Fla., has been fired after he brought targets bearing images resembling Trayvon Martin — a silhouetted figure in a hooded sweatshirt, holding a canned drink — to a police target practice session.

"Whether his act was hatred or stupidity, none is tolerable," Port Canaveral CEO John Walsh says of former officer Ron King, in a report by local station WFTV.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Sun April 14, 2013

China Reports 13 Bird Flu Deaths; Cases Climb To 60

People sit near pigeons at a park in Shanghai Sunday. A new strain of bird flu has spread from eastern China to other provinces, with 13 deaths reported.
AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:30 am

Health officials in China say they've confirmed 11 new bird flu diagnoses, bringing the number of H7N9 infections to 60, with cases spread across several provinces, the official Xinhua news agency reports. The virus, which first infected people in Shanghai and eastern China, has now sickened at least one person in Beijing, along with two others in the central province of Henan.

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Asia
9:13 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Will Lightning Strike Twice For K-Pop's PSY?

South Korean rapper PSY performs at his concert in Seoul, South Korea on Saturday.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 6:03 pm

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Business
6:28 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Tax Tips For Procrastinators, And You Know Who You Are

A customer goes over tax documents at a post office in New York City on last year's Tax Day.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:40 am

Still haven't filed your taxes, eh?

Well, you have until 11:59 p.m. Monday to get it all done — or at least file for an extension that gets you off the hook until Oct. 15. To help all of you procrastinators, here are answers to a few of your questions.

If I'm filing by mail, can I come skidding into the post office at 11:58 p.m. and still make the deadline?

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You Must Read This
6:03 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Dreaming Of Justice: Hardscrabble Lives In Hallucinatory Prose

Alex Espinoza is the author of The Five Acts of Diego León.

Before becoming a novelist and educator, I was a manager at a shop in Santa Monica, Calif., selling sofas and custom-framed art to movie stars and wealthy Angelinos. Eventually I grew frustrated and, determined to reinvent myself as a writer, I quit and went back to school.

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Poetry
5:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Harmony Holiday On Finding Poetry In Her Biracial Roots

Harmony Holiday is a poet who lives in New York.
Courtesy Harmony Holiday

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

In celebration of National Poetry Month, Weekend Edition is hearing from young poets about what poetry means to them. This week, they spoke with Harmony Holiday, a New York poet and dance choreographer who's spending this month archiving audio of overlooked and often misunderstood poetry for The Beautiful Voices Project.


Interview Highlights

On why she first started writing poetry

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Author Interviews
5:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

After Tragedy, Young Girl Shipped West On 'Orphan Train'

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 10:04 am

Christina Baker Kline's new novel, Orphan Train, is partially set in 1929, mere months before the stock market crash that would trigger the Great Depression. A young Irish girl, Niamh (pronounced "Neeve"), has just lost her entire family after a fire ripped through their tenement building. She is turned over to authorities who put her on a train bound for the Midwest. The train is filled with dozens of other children who have lost their families in one way or another; they are now hoping that their journey will connect them with new parents and a new, better life.

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