Music
1:04 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Randy Newman Becomes A Rock Star

Inductee Randy Newman performs on stage at the 28th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on April 18, 2013.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 3:05 pm

Randy Newman never considered himself a rock star. He's had his hits like, "I Love LA" and "Short People," but may be better known for his work in TV show themes and film scores. His unmistakable voice has graced the soundtracks of dozens of films, including the Toy Story films, A Bug's Life and Monsters, Inc.

When the singer and composer got a call saying he'd be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, he was shocked. He told Rolling Stone, "I really thought maybe I'd have to die first."

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Hospital Costs Go Public: What Changes In Health Care?

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. One hospital outside Dallas charges a little over 14 grand for pneumonia treatment. Another hospital a few miles down the same street charges more than twice as much, over $38,000. Why? Why has it taken so long for those prices to be made public? And now that they're out, how is that going to change health care?

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The Two-Way
12:57 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Air Force Strips 17 Officers Of Nuclear Missile Launch Authority

A Minuteman III missile inside its silo about 60 miles from Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D.
USAF Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 1:19 pm

Seventeen Air Force officers with control over nuclear missiles have had that authority suspended after receiving poor reviews on their mastery of launch operations, The Associated Press reports in an exclusive.

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NPR Story
12:53 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

What We Want From The Boston Marathon Bomber Trial

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:33 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Economy
12:46 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Nearly Three Years After Dodd-Frank, Reforms Happen Slowly

loveguli iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:06 pm

On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, commonly known as the Dodd-Frank bill. Reporter Gary Rivlin says "the passage of Dodd-Frank was something of a miracle." But to the chief lobbyist for the Financial Services Roundtable, a lobbying group that represents 100 of the country's largest financial institutions, it was just "halftime."

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Radio Diaries
12:28 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Teenage Diaries Revisited: From Kicking A Football To Kicking Meth

Frankie Lewchuk had been a high school football star whose picture was in his hometown newspaper every week. Now, after struggling with a crystal meth addiction, he is trying to repair his life.
Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 9:19 am

Name: Frankie Lewchuk

Hometown: Mentone, Ala.

Current city: Chattanooga, Tenn.

Occupation: Car stereo installer

Then:

"I used to be a wimp in school. ... Since I started playing football in 9th and 10th grade, all I did was get a haircut, start wearing decent clothes and play sports. Now I'm a popular person... and I want to keep it going that way."

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Monkey See
12:12 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Yippee-Kai-Yay, Mr. President: 'White House Down' Looks Very Familiar

Channing Tatum stars in White House Down.
Reiner Bajo Sony Pictures

Look, I like Channing Tatum. I like Jamie Foxx. And heaven knows, I love Die Hard.

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The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Police Chief: 'We Are Not Barbarians;' Bury Bombing Suspect

A video image showing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, before the April 15 bombings.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:16 pm

Saying that "we are not barbarians, we bury the dead," the police chief of Worcester, Mass., on Wednesday appealed for someone in authority to clear the way for the body of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev to be buried.

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Author Interviews
11:56 am
Wed May 8, 2013

What's The Most Meaningful Gift Your Mom Gave You?

Editor Elizabeth Benedict received this embroidered, black wool scarf from her mother. It was the last gift she got from her mom before she died.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:08 pm

Mother's Day is this Sunday. While some people are racking their brains to think of the perfect way to show their love and appreciation for Mom, a group of distinguished women recently flipped that script and wrote about the most profound gift their own moms gave to them. Their essays are collected in the new book What My Mother Gave Me: Thirty-One Women on the Gifts That Mattered Most.

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News
11:42 am
Wed May 8, 2013

The Missing Women Were Seemingly In Plain Sight

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we are going to talk about some controversies in hip hop recently that raise questions about just what crosses the line now between what's acceptable and what isn't and who decides that. That's coming up later in the program.

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