The Two-Way
8:46 am
Sun April 21, 2013

London Marathon Marked By High Security, Memories Of Boston

London Marathon runners stand in a silent, pre-race tribute Sunday to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings. The police presence was increased for the London event.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 2:24 pm

The London Marathon observed 30 seconds of silence before the race got underway Sunday, in a show of solidarity with the victims of Monday's attack at the Boston Marathon. Many runners and spectators wore black ribbons to honor the three people killed and the more than 170 injured in two bombings.

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Boston Update: Officials Wait To Question Suspect; Memorial Held Sunday

People gather at a makeshift memorial for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings at the edge of the still-closed section of Boylston Street. The surviving suspect in the case, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, remains in the hospital.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:26 am

(Most recent update: 4:20 p.m. ET)

Investigators are still waiting to interview Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, whose wounds reportedly include injuries to his neck and leg. An official tells CNN that Tsarnaev has been "intubated and sedated," rendering him unable to speak with them.

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National Security
6:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Boston, Bombs And Lessons From Israel

Workers repair the Cafe Hillel in front of candles for the victims of a suicide attack in west Jerusalem on Sept. 10, 2003. Eight people, including the bomber, died and several dozen were wounded by the explosion that went off near the popular cafe.
Pedro Ugarte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 8:50 am

As reporters in Jerusalem a decade ago, my wife, Jennifer Griffin, and I covered more than 100 suicide bombings over several blood-soaked years. The carnage defined our lives as we raced to blast sites, interviewed battered survivors in emergency rooms and tracked down the extremists behind the deadly attacks.

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Middle East
6:38 am
Sun April 21, 2013

New Aid To Syria Comes With Fear Of Funding The Wrong Opposition

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry listens in during a "Friends of Syria" group meeting hosted on Saturday in Istanbul, Turkey.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 8:09 pm

At an 11-nation meeting in Turkey this weekend, there was one thing the United States, European and Arab states could agree on: With more than 70,000 killed and millions of people displaced, the Syrian crisis, as Secretary of State John Kerry says, is "horrific."

In response, the Obama administration is doubling its non-lethal assistance to the Syrian opposition, Kerry announced at the meeting.

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Joe has previously served as Managing Editor of Urban Tulsa Weekly, as the Arts & Entertainment Editor at Oklahoma Gazette and worked as a Staff Writer for The Oklahoman. Joe was a weekly correspondent for KGOU from 2007-2010. He grew up in Bartlesville, Okla., lives in Oklahoma City, and studied journalism at the University of Central Oklahoma.

Law
5:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

Thirsty States Take Water Battle To Supreme Court

A dispute over Texas' access to the Kiamichi River, which is located in Oklahoma, has started a longer legal battle that is headed to the Supreme Court.
Joe Wertz for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 12:39 pm

On Tuesday, Oklahoma and Texas will face off in the U.S. Supreme Court. The winner gets water. And this is not a game.

The court will hear oral arguments in the case of Tarrant Regional Water District v. Herrmann, et al. The case pits Oklahoma against Texas over rights to water from the river that forms part of the border between them. Depending on how the court decides, it could impact interstate water-sharing agreements across the country.

Keeping Up With Texas

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Author Interviews
5:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

For A Student Of Theology, Poetry Reverberates

Nate Klug is a poet, translator and candidate for ordained ministry in the United Church of Christ. He lives in New Haven, Conn., where he studies at Yale Divinity School.
Frank Brown Courtesy Nate Klug

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and NPR is celebrating by asking young poets what poetry means to them. This week, Weekend Edition speaks with Nate Klug, whose poems have appeared in Poetry, Threepenny Review and other journals. Klug is also a master of divinity candidate at the Yale Divinity School and a candidate for ordination in the United Church of Christ. "It's nice to go home from a day of thinking about the church to this whole other world of poetry," he says. "But obviously there are some really amazing ways that they intersect."

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Sunday Puzzle
5:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

You'll Get It Just Right, Junior

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the initials "J.R."

Last week's challenge from listener Sandy Weisz: Take a common English word. Write it in capital letters. Move the first letter to the end and rotate it 90 degrees. You'll get a new word that is pronounced exactly the same as the first word. What words are these?

Answer: Won, one; wry, rye

Winner: Ben Austin of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.

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Theater
5:45 am
Sun April 21, 2013

L.A. On B'way: Midler, Mengers Take Manhattan

Bette Midler in I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers. Midler stars as Mengers, a legendary and larger-than-life Hollywood agent whose sharp wit won her both friends and foes in the film industry.
Richard Termine/BBBway

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

After more than 40 years away, Bette Midler is returning to Broadway. She's playing legendary Hollywood agent Sue Mengers in a riotous solo show titled I'll Eat You Last.

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