Around the Nation
2:18 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Gustave Whitehead and the No. 21. Connecticut claims that Whitehead's half-mile flight in 1901 was the first flight, not the well-known Wright brothers' flight that occurred two years later.
Courtesy Deutsches Flugpioniermuseum Gustav Weisskopf Leutershausen/Historical Flight Research Committee Gustave Whitehead

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:35 pm

The ongoing battle between historians over who was really first in flight was rekindled last week.

New research advances the theory that a German immigrant in Connecticut is responsible for the first powered and controlled flight, rather than the Wright brothers in North Carolina.

But historians at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum are saying not so fast.

Finding The Evidence

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Shots - Health News
2:16 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children.
Randy Davey Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

A controversial government proposal to test the anthrax vaccine in children would be unethical without first conducting much more research, a presidential commission concluded Tuesday.

"The federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered," Amy Gutmann, who chairs the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, tells Shots. "It would not be ethical to do it today."

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Shots - Health News
2:15 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 6:44 am

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

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The Salt
2:14 am
Tue March 19, 2013

'Drunken Botanist' Takes A Garden Tour Of The Liquor Cabinet

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:43 am

The next time you're sipping on a glass of something boozy, consider the plants behind your beverage. Some of them might spring immediately to mind: grapes in your wineglass, rye in your whiskey bottle, juniper in your gin and tonic. But what about sorghum and coriander? Cinchona and bitter orange?

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All Tech Considered
6:14 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

CEO Of Electronic Arts, World's Third-Largest Gaming Company, Resigns

Electronic Arts CEO John Riccitiello, seen here speaking at the E3 Expo in 2010, is stepping down, the company announced Monday.
Michal Czerwonka Getty Images

Electronic Arts, the world's third-largest video game company, announced Monday that CEO John Riccitiello would be stepping down.

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Argentine President Asks Pope Francis To Mediate Falklands Dispute

Pope Francis meets Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner on Monday in Vatican City.
L'Osservatore Romano Getty Images

In their first meeting since Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became Pope Francis, Argentina's President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner asked the pontiff to "mediate" in the dispute over the Falkland Islands.

"This is an important moment for us," Kirchner said, during a press conference following the lunch meeting. "I asked him for his mediation to try to find a dialogue on the question of the Falkland Islands."

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All Tech Considered
4:45 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Maker Of 3-D Printer Guns Now Has Federal Firearms License

This AR-15 rifle's lower receiver (in soft green color) was produced with a 3-D printer. The 3-D printing industry has criticized the use of the technology for gun part making.
Courtesy of Defense Distributed Dev Blog

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The Two-Way
4:34 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Bloomberg Wants Retailers To Keep Tobacco Products Out Of Sight

Harry Patel, an employee of Blondie's Deli and Grocery, talks on the phone while waiting for customers in New York on Monday. A new anti-smoking proposal would make New York the first city in the nation to keep tobacco products out of sight in retail stores.
Mark Lennihan AP

First supersized soda, now cigarettes: Under New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's new plan, retailers in the city would have to keep tobacco products out of sight. The goal, he says, is to curb the rate of youth smoking.

The measure would make New York the first city in the nation to keep tobacco products out of sight in stores.

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All Tech Considered
4:24 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Can 'Smart Gun' Technology Help Prevent Violence?

This 9 mm semi-automatic handgun is configured with transducers in its handle that can detect the grasp of an authorized user.
New Jersey Institute of Technology AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:54 pm

For years, many have dreamed of so-called smart guns, weapons that know their rightful owner and won't fire in the wrong hands. Think James Bond's gun in Skyfall.

A few major gun makers experimented with smart guns in the 1990s, but none came to market. Since then, it's been the domain of entrepreneurs and inventors.

Developers And Technologists

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U.S.
4:13 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Among Thousands Of Gun Deaths, Only One Charles Foster Jr.

Led by the Rev. Willie Phillips (center), protesters march in February against violence in and around Club Majestic.
Mike Haskey Courtesy of The Ledger Enquirer

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:45 pm

The Morris Missionary Baptist Church is nestled down a red dirt road, in Morris, Ga., set among pine trees near the Alabama state line. Next to the small white church lies its most recent grave site: that of Charles Foster Jr.

While the mass killings in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., garnered a frenzy of news coverage, statistically, they are not the norm. Each year, thousands of gun homicides in the U.S. — 11,000 in 2010 alone — attract little or no media attention.

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