Ask Me Another
10:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

But Did You Read the Book?

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, what we've all been waiting for. Let's bring back the winners of our previous rounds to play our Ask Me One More final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From Answer in the Form of a Question: Nick Hudak. From Top Row: Lorna Jordan. From the Philosopher's Comedy Club: Stan Lee. From Call Me M.B.: Peter Hoffman. And from Buy a Vowel: Jessica O'Connell.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And I'm going to ask our puzzle guru John Chaneski to take us out. What do we got, John?

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Ask Me Another
10:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Call Me M.B.

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Have no fear, we're about to dumb it down here a little bit.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: We are taking a departure from philosophy and going to pop music.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I'm sure our next two contestants are excited about that. We have Noel Camacho and Peter Hoffman, and I believe they can handle that. Let's find out. They are behind their puzzle hot seats, although they're standing, so it's more like puzzle hot spots. Noel, you have some big things that you do with your life.

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Ask Me Another
10:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Answer In The Form Of A Question

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Right now, we're about to get down to business with Nick Hudak and Curtis Dunn. They are our first two fabulous contestants.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Nick, you're a trivia guy.

NICK HUDAK: I generally like to think so.

EISENBERG: Do you watch any "Jeopardy?"

HUDAK: I do. My father actually was on "Jeopardy." He did very well until the very end, and then we lost. But we won a lovely refrigerator and a signed home edition.

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Ask Me Another
10:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Buy A Vowel

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

All right, let's welcome our next two contestants: Billy Zayac and Jessica O'Connell. Welcome to ASK ME ANOTHER.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Billy Zayac, you have a degree in library science.

BILLY ZAYAC: Yes, I do.

EISENBERG: What is your dream library job?

ZAYAC: I would like to work in a special library doing something with cataloging, hopefully.

EISENBERG: That sounds reasonable. I like that.

(LAUGHTER)

ZAYAC: I'm very open.

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Ask Me Another
10:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Top Row

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER, NPR's hour of puzzles, word games, and trivia. I'm your host Ophira Eisenberg and this hour we're featuring some of the most mind-bending games we have ever played. In the studio with me is our puzzle editor Art Chung and our next number is called Top Row, which unfortunately has nothing to do with top shelf. It has everything to do with QWERTYUIOP.

ART CHUNG: I don't think QWERTYUIOP is a word.

EISENBERG: Check your computer.

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Book Reviews
10:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother' Inspires The Story Of 'Mary Coin'

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:00 pm

I shied away from Marisa Silver's new novel because of its book jacket: a reproduction of Dorothea Lange's iconic Depression-era photograph called "Migrant Mother." You know it: the woman's strong face is worn and worried; her children lean protectively into her. Lange took the photo at a pea-pickers' camp in California in 1936; the name of the destitute mother of seven, who wasn't identified till the 1970s, is Florence Owens Thompson. The photo on Silver's book jacket is colorized.

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It's All Politics
10:35 am
Thu February 28, 2013

How Washington Chose Not To Be Careful With Spending Cuts

Under sequestration, federal agencies don't have the flexibility to choose to spare popular programs or services by making administrative cuts elsewhere.
Tatiana Popova iStockphoto.com

Inconveniencing the public is part of the plan.

It may never have been intended to play out in quite this way, but the automatic spending cuts set to take effect for most federal programs Friday leave little room for preserving the most visible and popular programs.

"The law basically says the cuts have to be across-the-board by 'project, program and activity,' " says Stan Collender, a federal budget expert with the communications firm Qorvis. "That was specifically written to take away flexibility from the administration."

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Mastermind Of Great Train Robbery Dies

The Great Train Robbers (from left): Buster Edwards, Tom Wisbey, Jim White, Bruce Reynolds, Roger Cordrey, Charlie Wilson and Jim Hussey, with copies of their book The Train Robbers in 1979.
Michael Fresco Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:26 am

Bruce Reynolds, the brains behind the Great Train Robbery of 1963, has died at the age of 81, nearly five decades after he and his partners in crime made off with 2.6 million pounds at Ledburn, Buckinghamshire, England.

Reynolds was part of the gang that executed an elaborate scheme to swipe the cash from the Glasgow-to-Euston mail train. The clockwork nature of the crime, along with the fact that the bulk of the loot was never recovered and some of the robbers never captured, has made it a favorite subject of television and films, as well as popular music.

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The Salt
10:22 am
Thu February 28, 2013

China's Horses May End Up In Russia's Kabobs

The great horse meat scandal infographic.
via The Australian Institute of Food Safety

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 11:15 am

China isn't a good place to be a horse, if your goal is to avoid ending up as the Russian kabobs known as shashlik.

China exports the most horse meat to the global market, while Russia has the biggest appetite for horseflesh, according to a new infographic on the continuing European scandal over horse meat sold as beef.

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Shots - Health News
9:17 am
Thu February 28, 2013

New York Medical School Widens Nontraditional Path For Admissions

iStockphoto.com

Should students who want to attend medical school have to slog through a year of physics, memorize the structures of dozens of cellular chemicals or spend months studying for the MCAT? Not necessarily.

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