The Two-Way
6:08 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Nor'easter Adds Fear To Misery In N.Y. And N.J.

The snow this morning in Manhattan's Central Park, where several inches fell.
Margot Adler NPR

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:25 am

  • Martin Kaste on 'Morning Editon'

Still struggling to recover from Superstorm Sandy, parts of New Jersey, New York City and surrounding regions are today digging out from a Nor'easter that dropped several inches of snow (more in some places) and caused more power outages.

We're following the news about the impact of the latest storm.

Update at noon, ET. Getting The Power Back On In New Jersey:

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Going 'Marbles': From Manic Highs To Oceanic Lows

Gotham

Marbles, cartoonist Ellen Forney's excellent graphic memoir about being bipolar, opens with her in the middle of a 5 1/2-hour session in a tattoo parlor. Every time the needle traces a line, Forney writes, she can "see the sensation — a bright white light, an electrical charge." Those opening words are a perfect description of her book. From the very first page, Forney allows us to see sensation — to inhabit, as closely as possible, her bipolar world, from its manic, exhilarating highs to its oceanic, debilitating lows.

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Around the Nation
5:23 am
Thu November 8, 2012

N.Y. Schools Scramble To Relocate Storm Victims

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Most of New York City's one million public school students went back to class on Monday, a week after Sandy hit. Still dozens of school buildings were flooded, damaged, without power so their students had to relocate. Beth Fertig of member station WNYC visited one of those schools in its new location on Staten Island.

BETH FERTIG, BYLINE: Intermediate School 2 is almost a mile away from the beach. But when the surge of water came during Hurricane Sandy, Principal Adrian Stallone(ph) says it flooded the basement.

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Election 2012
5:05 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Calif. Affirms Death Penalty, Amends 'Three Strikes'

Mike Reynolds authored California's three-strikes law after his daughter, Kimber, was killed in a 1992 purse snatching. On Tuesday, Californians approved a ballot initiative that weakens the law — a measure Reynolds opposed.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 11:15 am

Several thousand prisoners in California may be eligible to apply for sentence reductions, after voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot initiative Tuesday that alters the state's controversial three-strikes law.

But voters also rejected a proposition that would abolish the death penalty in the state. Proposition 34 would have replaced capital punishment with life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Nor'Easter Hits Sandy-Ravaged East Coast

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Last night, a nor'easter blew hard along the coast bringing new misery to those in New York and New Jersey, already without heat, power or, in some cases, a place to live.

We're joined now for more on that storm by NPR's Martin Kaste who's in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Good morning.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Tell us where you are and what you're seeing, Martin.

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Syrian Opposition Groups Try To Reinvigorate Mission

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Opposition groups working to bring down the regime in Syria are meeting in Doha, Qatar in a furious bid to reorganize and reinvigorate themselves. The aim is to form a legitimate government in exile that would be recognized by the international community. This new effort to bring together the Syrian opposition is strongly backed by the U.S. NPR's Kelly McEvers is in Doha and joins us to talk about it.

And let's start by you telling us exactly who is there.

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Thu November 8, 2012

South Africa Bank Notes Feature Nelson Mandela

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is Mandela money.

That's Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid leader and first black president of South Africa. He's now also the first black person to grace South Africa's currency.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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All Songs Considered
3:48 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Hear The Rolling Stones' Brand New 'One More Shot'

DAVID J. PHILLIP AP/Press Association Images

From the opening chugging guitar sound, this song could only be The Rolling Stones. For the first time in seven years, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood got together to record two new songs, and you can hear "One More Shot," which was recorded in Paris with Don Was producing, right here.

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Shots - Health News
2:30 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Hospitals Gamble On Urgent Care Clinics To Keep Patients Healthy

Dr. Wanda Simmons-Clemmons examines Dawn Antonelli at the PromptCare urgent care clinic.
Jenny Gold for NPR

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:51 pm

When Stephen Wheeler realized he had an aching, swollen finger, he called his primary care doctor, who works for MedStar Health. The doctor referred him to PromptCare, an urgent care clinic in a strip mall in the Baltimore suburbs.

Wheeler says he probably would have ended up waiting a long time if he'd gone to the doctor. And even longer at the emergency room.

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The Salt
2:29 am
Thu November 8, 2012

Americans Rediscover The Kick Of Hard Cider

A growing number of U.S. consumers are finding much to enjoy in this fruity alcoholic beverage, driving an increase in cider sales. The Vermont Hard Cider Company now produces 70,000 cases of Woodchuck Hard Cider each week.
Ben Sarle Vermont Hard Cider Company

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:52 pm

A couple hundred years ago. hard apple cider used to be the drink of choice for thirsty Americans. It was easy to make and easy to find. But as people moved into cities, and beer became more popular, cider fell out of fashion.

Now it's come roaring back. U.S. hard cider sales are up 65 percent over last year, and just about all the big beer companies sell it, as well as many artisan brewers. Finding cider at your local bar is often no longer a problem.

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