Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:28 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Post-Sandy, Residents Gut Hard-Hit Rockaway

Volunteers help to clean up in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 5:36 pm

Ferry service into Manhattan started Monday for the Rockaway section of Queens, one of the hardest-hit New York City neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy. Many residents are still feeling cut off, struggling without power or adequate public transportation options. And now worries about mold are creeping in.

But the new ferries were a small consolation for the trickle of commuters who trudged onto Manhattan soil for the first time in two weeks. Some of them, like Sheila Curran, were grinning all the way down the plank.

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Economy
3:28 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Opportunities Emerge For Vets In Tough Job Market

Last year, Congress passed legislation that — among other things — gave employers tax credits for hiring vets.
Haraz N. Ghanbari AP

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 5:28 pm

Many veterans aren't just looking for a job; they're looking for a career, a calling and, of course, financial stability. Those recently separated from the military have to confront what is still a fairly weak civilian job market.

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Shots - Health News
2:49 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Malaria-Like Disease Follows Lyme's Path In New England

As white-tailed deer have returned to New England in the past century, they've brought with them tick-borne parasites that cause human diseases.
marcinplaza iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:07 pm

There's more than deer lurking in the New England woods these days.

Diseases carried by ticks that hitch rides on deer are rising in the Northeast, researchers said Monday at a meeting about tropical diseases.

In particular, babesiosis — a disease that mimics malaria — is catching up with Lyme disease in some communities.

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The Picture Show
2:37 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Portraits Of America's New Veterans

Courtesy of Ashlei Quinones

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 3:32 pm

As of July 2012, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs, there were more than 22 million veterans in America — roughly 7 percent of the country's population.

The last surviving veteran of World War I, Frank Buckles, died just last year at age 110. But many men and women at least a quarter of that age are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan every day.

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

VIDEO: Venice Floods, But It Doesn't Stop The Tourists

People sit at the table of a bar in a flooded St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy on Sunday.
Luigi Costantini AP

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 2:10 pm

In a city so used to flooding, life doesn't stop when the water's knee-deep.

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Afghanistan
2:29 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Afghans Brace For U.S. Departure In 2014

Afghan villagers look at a translator as U.S. soldiers tend to an injured local Afghan man, who was shot for being suspected of planting a roadside bomb in Genrandai village at Panjwai district, Kandahar, on Sept. 24.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 4:47 pm

Uncertainty is gripping Afghanistan as the clock ticks toward the withdrawal of NATO combat troops by the end of 2014.

People and money are leaving the country. Housing prices are falling. Construction is slowing down. Many Afghans are trying to be hopeful, but even the most optimistic admit that a number of troubling variables could determine what post-2014 Afghanistan looks like.

The Panjshir Valley, some 60 miles north of Kabul, is one of the most scenic places in Afghanistan. The Panjshir River winds its way through barren mountains.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Georgia Immigration Law Trips Up Doctors And Nurses

Workers in the Georgia secretary of state's office have fallen behind on licensing applications for nurses.
Jim Burress WABE

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 6:39 am

Hundreds of health care workers in Georgia are losing their licenses to practice because of a problem created by a new immigration law in the state.

The law requires everyone — no matter where they were born — to prove their citizenship or legal residency to renew their professional licenses.

With too few state workers to process the extra paperwork, licenses for doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals are expiring.

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Education
2:05 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Firestorm Erupts Over Virginia's Education Goals

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 4:47 pm

As part of Virginia's waiver to opt out of mandates set out in the No Child Left Behind law, the state has created a controversial new set of education goals that are higher for white and Asian kids than for blacks, Latinos and students with disabilities.

Virginia Democratic state Sen. Donald McEachin first read about the state's new performance goals for schoolchildren in a newspaper editorial.

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The Record
1:58 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Iran To Israel And Back To Iran: Rita's Music Goes Home

Rita reimagined classic Persian songs for her latest album, My Joys.
Courtesy of Fistuk Artists

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 8:12 am

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NPR Story
1:35 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

'Who I Am': The Public And Private Pete Townshend

Legendary guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend composed rock operas like Tommy and Quadrophenia, and helped define rock music for generations.
Ross Halfin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 2:31 pm

One of the most gifted rock guitarists of the last 50 years — and the main songwriter and creative force behind The Who — Pete Townshend spent decades touring the globe and writing rock operas like Tommy and Quadrophenia. He helped define rock 'n' roll for his generation and many to follow.

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