It's All Politics
4:49 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Legal Battle Surrounds Florida Early Voting Dispute

Floridians stand in line during the last day of early voting in Miami on Saturday. A judge extended early-voting hours in one Florida county Sunday after Democrats sued to allow more time.
Alan Diaz AP

Early voting ended in Florida on Saturday. But on Sunday, some county elections officials opened their offices to allow people to vote using absentee ballots.

In Miami-Dade County, elections officials opened the office for over-the-counter absentee voting, but then inexplicably shut down. A couple of hundred waiting voters began chanting and pounding on the doors. An hour later, the office reopened.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
4:49 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Hard-Hit Long Island Awaits Power As Temps Drop

A plea to the Long Island Power Authority for electricity to be restored is posted on a barrier last Wednesday in Mastic Beach, N.Y. The south shore Long Island community was among the hardest hit by the storm that pounded the Northeast.
Frank Eltman AP

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 5:49 pm

A week after Hurricane Sandy hit the region, roughly 1 million people are still without power in the New York area, and more than one-third of those live on Long Island.

In the hierarchy of hurricanes that have hit Mastic Beach, N.Y., over the years, this one ranks near the top, says Mayor Bill Biondi.

"This is the worse we've had in a long time," Biondi says. "I guess the only thing that was worse than this ... was the hurricane of 1938. I haven't seen or heard anything in between those years that was worse than this one."

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The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

All Across Syria, A Bloody Day

Syrians gather at the site of a car bombing Monday that killed 11 people and wounded dozens in Damascus, according to the SANA news agency, which provided the photo. The violence in the city was described as some of the worst in recent months.
SANA EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 5:40 pm

The fighting in Syria was both nasty and widespread on Monday. Here's a summary of some of the worst fighting:

-- Two deadly car bombings took place, one in a residential neighborhood in Damascus that killed 11 people, according to Syria's state-run SANA news agency. The other one, near the central city of Hama, generated wildly conflicting claims. An activist group, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, said the suicide attack killed 50 government soldiers and allied gunmen. But the government put the death toll at two civilians.

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A Blog Supreme
4:26 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

'Treme,' Ep. 27: Fat Tuesday 2008

Aaron Neville performs with The Neville Brothers in Treme.
Paul Schiraldi HBO

The three seasons of Treme have all found their way to Mardi Gras; appropriately, the day is always depicted with all the spectacle, vice and musical mayhem you might expect. Josh Jackson of WBGO returns to break down the many musical scenes in this year's go-round.


Patrick Jarenwattananon: So many flashes of live music this episode. Let's start at the beginning. Did you recognize the band where Lieut. Colson and his fellow officer are talking, and there are (clothed) women on poles in the French Quarter?

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The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

EPA Cites Hyundai, Kia For Inflating Gas Mileage On 900,000 Cars

The Environmental Protection Agency found Hyundai and its sister company, Kia, overstated the fuel economy ratings on about 900,000 cars.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 5:16 pm

If you bought a Hyundai or Kia over the past three years, you could soon be getting some money back from the two automakers.

The Environmental Protection Agency says the South Korean carmakers, owned by the same parent company, overstated the gas mileage on 900,000 vehicles over the past three years. The EPA discovered the bloated figures during an audit of gas mileage tests undertaken by the companies. The agency said last week it was investigating how the carmakers arrived at the numbers.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Republican Grab For Senate Seats May Not Come Easy

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 4:49 pm

Melissa Block talks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the Senate races to watch on Tuesday.

The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Shh! 400-Foot-Long Trailer Carrying Radioactive Material Is On Secret Mission

A screen image from a Mack Trucks video about one of the earlier hauls.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1TBWJw4q50&feature=plcp

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The Salt
3:48 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Cookies, Wax And The Vote: Kids Choose The Next President

Noah Hope, 10, shows off his I Voted sticker during the children's mock Election Day at Madame Tussaud Wax Museum in Washington D.C.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 3:14 pm

Election Day is Tuesday, and it's easy to forget about those who don't have a vote — children. But it can be a fun experience if parents take the time to include the kids, and maybe bribe them with a little sugar.

Over the weekend, the Madame Tussaud Wax Museum in Washington D.C, did just that. Kids got to make patriotic sugar cookies, personally meet all the American presidents' wax figures and vote for the next president of the United States.

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Movies
3:43 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Lincoln's Screen Legacy, Decidedly Larger Than Life

Lincoln's life has been adapted for the screen so often that there's room for the artistic liberties of films like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.
Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 4:49 pm

He's a statue in many a monument, a profile on the penny, a face on the $5 bill, and an animatronic robot at Disneyland. He's even carved into a mountain in South Dakota. So, of course, Abe Lincoln has been a character in the movies — more than 300 of them, in fact.

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Middle East
3:40 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

In Syria's Biggest City, A Deadly Stalemate

A rebel fighter raises his weapon after firing a missile Sunday toward Syrian government troops in the northern city of Aleppo. Syria's largest city has been the scene of heavy fighting for the past three months. Both sides control part of the city, and the fight has been a stalemate recently.
Narciso Contreras AP

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 7:16 pm

Before the Syrian uprising, Aleppo was many things: Syria's largest city, its economic hub and cultural capital, one of the oldest, continuously occupied cities in the world.

Now, Aleppo has a more ominous distinction: a city that's seen some of the worst destruction, not only in Syria, but of any battleground in many years.

It's been more than three months since rebels in Syria launched an offensive to take Aleppo. In the early days of the offensive, the rebels were able to take about half the city.

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