Asia
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Amid Calls For Reform, China Waits For New Leaders

Guards stand outside the Xinhua Gate of the Zhongnanhai leadership compound in central Beijing earlier this year. China is preparing for a once-a-decade leadership change amid signs of growing public dissatisfaction.
David Gray Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

The slogan "Long Live the Great Communist Party of China" is emblazoned on the wall outside the Beijing compound where the country's leaders live and work.

But now that party is under pressure to change as it prepares for a once-in-a-decade transition of power, which starts at a party congress scheduled to begin Nov. 8.

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Religion
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

'Mother Of Outcasts' To Be A Saint For Leprosy Work

Mother Marianne Cope (in wheelchair) with other nuns and the women and girls of Bishop Home in Kalaupapa, Hawaii, shortly before her death in 1918.
Sisters of St. Francis Archive

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

A German-American nun will become a saint Sunday, nearly a century after her death. Mother Marianne Cope is the second person to be honored in this way for caring for people in Hawaii with leprosy, now known as Hansen's disease.

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National Security
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Wondering About The Cost Of War? We Have Answers

Sgt. Ben Roberts (center), recently returned from Afghanistan, speaks with Chick-fil-A manager Michael Sims at a military job fair in Columbia, S.C., in January.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

As we approach the presidential election in November, Weekend Edition is seeking your questions about issues and candidates in a segment called Reporter Hotline. This week, our focus is veterans affairs and defense spending.


Paying For War

Question from Sue Hoben of Canton, Conn.: "Why don't we increase taxes when we wage a war? For instance, Iraq and Afghanistan. Surely if national interest is at stake, then we should be willing to pay the price rather than add to the deficit."

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Movies
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

A Look At 'The Girl' Who Caught Hitchcock's Eye

Tippi Hedren (played by Sienna Millier) starred in two of Alfred Hitchcock's (Toby Jones) films: Marnie and The Birds.
Kelly Walsh HBO

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 8:24 am

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Asia
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

An American 'Revolutionary' In China

Mao Zedong signs Sidney Rittenberg's copy of The Little Red Book during a gathering of party leaders in Beijing on May 1, 1967, at the beginning of China's Cultural Revolution.
Courtesy of Sidney Rittenberg

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 4:37 pm

Sidney Rittenberg went to China as an American GI at the end of World War II and fell in love with the country. He was discharged as a Chinese translator for the U.S. Army, but decided to stay there.

By the time Rittenberg came back to the United States, more than 30 years later, he had become one of only a few American citizens to join the Chinese Communist Party. He translated English for Chairman Mao Zedong, told off Madame Mao during the Cultural Revolution, and endured 16 years of solitary confinement in Chinese prisons.

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Arts & Life
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Examining The Economy Of Art Thieves

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There was a huge art heist this week. Paintings by Gauguin, Matisse, Picasso, Monet and other artists were stolen from an exhibition hall in Rotterdam. Picasso's "Harlequin Head" and Monet's "Waterloo Bridge" were among the purloined works. And their loss is estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars.

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Author Interviews
5:37 am
Sat October 20, 2012

'John Lennon Letters' Reveal A Life As It Happened

John Lennon signs autographs during the filming of The Magical Mystery Tour.
Jim Gray Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

John Lennon loved word play; he wrote songs that have not only become standards, but also milestones, like "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and "Strawberry Fields," which he wrote with the Beatles, and "Imagine" and "Give Peace a Chance," which he wrote on his own. For most of his life, he also composed letters to friends and family; then lovers, as he grew up; and strangers, as he grew famous. His notes, letters and postcards often contained small, funny drawings and self portraits.

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Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Placido Domingo On Pop Singers And Karaoke

Placido Domingo's new album, Songs, is his first collection of pop music in more than 20 years.
Ruben Martin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

Placido Domingo is one of the most influential people in classical music. During a 50-year career, he's played more than 140 roles, conducted more than 450 operas, and won just about every award that a human being can win in opera and life.

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Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat October 20, 2012

Brandy's 'Two Eleven' Is One For Whitney

Brandy's latest studio album is called Two Eleven.
Gomillion & Leupold Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:21 pm

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:04 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi Plays Not My Job

Nancy Pelosi takes the stage during Day Two of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in September.
Alex Wong Getty Images

In January 2007, Democratic Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California was sworn in as the speaker of the House of Representatives — and became the first woman to hold that position. She is currently the House minority leader.

We've invited Pelosi to play a game about men breaking gender barriers — three questions about men who've gone where no man has gone before.

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