NPR Story
3:19 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Recording Hepatitis C: A Patient's Treatment Journal

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Ana Johnson of San Marcos, Texas, underwent treatment for hepatitis C last year. She believes she contracted the disease after receiving a blood transfusion during a C-section. Johnson lived with the diagnosis for 17 years before seeking treatment. She says her mind changed because her treatment options changed.

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Channel 5
3:16 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Herbert Hoover: Landslide

This program looks at the life of Herbert Hoover through interviews with notable historians and Hoover scholars.
Courtesy of Courtesy Stamats Communications, Inc.

Herbert Hoover was a politician and a humanitarian whose legacy has been largely defined by the Great Depression. When he was elected president in a landslide victory in 1928, Hoover had never before held public office. Yet his remarkable humanitarian work and career as a mining engineer, businessman and U.S. Secretary of Commerce carried him to office. When the stock market crashed on October 29, 1929, Hoover's agenda was derailed by the worsening economic crisis.

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Mom And Dad's Record Collection
3:11 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Loving An Album To Death Makes A Music Fan For Life

Little Darrin Wolsko spent a chunk of his childhood playing his father's copy of The Beatles self-titled album, best known as The White Album, over and over.
Courtesy of the Wolsko family

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 5:19 pm

All this summer, All Things Considered is digging into the record collections of listeners' parents to hear about one song introduced by a parent that has stayed with you.

Among the many records Darrin Wolsko spun while donning a red cape around 1985, The Beatles' self-titled release best known as The White Album got the most plays — "to the point where I destroyed the album. I shredded this album to pieces," Wolsko says.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Rebutting Tax Criticism, Romney Gives A Number

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 5:19 pm

Mitt Romney told reporters Thursday that he has never paid less than a 13 percent tax rate over the past decade. Until now, the presumptive Republican nominee had sidestepped questions about his personal income taxes. Romney has come under withering criticism over the tax issue from President Obama's campaign and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Facebook Shares Battered As Insiders Are Allowed To Sell

An illustration of an Apple iPhone displaying the Facebook app's splash screen in front of the login page.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

At one point today, Facebook's stock price sunk to a new low. At about $19.69, it was worth about half of what it was initially sold for in May.

Bloomberg explains that what is happening is that early investors in the company — including founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg — were allowed to sell some of their stocks for the first time today.

Bloomberg adds:

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The Two-Way
2:21 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

News Media's Credibility Ratings Have Slipped Sharply, Survey Says

Pew Research Center

"Believability ratings have fallen significantly for nine of 13 news organizations tested," the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press reports today.

Its latest national survey signals that "the falloff in credibility affects news organizations in most sectors: national newspapers, such as The New York Times and USA Today, all three cable news outlets, as well as the broadcast TV networks and NPR."

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Channel 5
2:18 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Hub City Sound: Colin Gilmore

Colin Gilmore performs at the Buddy Holly Center's annual Summer Showcase Concert Series.

Environment
2:10 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

When This Oil Spills, It's 'A Whole New Monster'

An oil sheen appears along the shore of the Kalamazoo. More than 800,000 gallons of oil entered Talmadge Creek and flowed into the Kalamazoo River, a Lake Michigan tributary. Heavy rains caused the river to overtop existing dams and carried oil 30 miles downstream.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 5:19 pm

Sometime in the next few months, David Daniel probably will have to stand by and watch as bulldozers knock down his thick forest and dig up the streams he loves.

His East Texas property is one of more than 1,000 in the path of a new pipeline, the southern stretch of what is known as the Keystone XL system.

For years, Daniel has tried to avoid this fate — or at least figure out what risks will come with it. But it has been difficult for him to get straight answers about the tar sands oil the pipeline will carry, and what happens when it spills.

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Religion
1:57 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

What Lies Ahead For America's Nuns

After the Vatican accused the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, America's largest organization of Catholic nuns, of failing to follow Church doctrine on several controversial issues, the group's president suggested they will not backing down.

Channel 5
1:49 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Market Warriors: Philadelphia

Picker Miller Gaffney tries on some vintage fashion on MARKET WARRIORS.
Courtesy of (c) David Aaron Troy for MARKET WARRIORS

This week on MARKET WARRIORS, our pickers (Miller, John, Bob and Kevin) are in the city of brotherly love working in close quarters at the 60-vendor Phila Flea Market. Working within their fixed budgets, the challenge is to find costume jewelry with an eye toward selling their finds for profit at auction. In this week’s episode, one picker will make a fatal mistake. Off-screen host Mark L. Walberg points out some notable picks including a set by the French jeweler Marcel Boucher and additional items such as a Playboy™ ice bucket and a Japanese mixed metal vase.

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