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The Checkout: Live
9:44 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Matthew Stevens Group: Live At Berklee

Matthew Stevens performs at Berklee College of Music, with bassist Vicente Archer.
Michael Borgida Courtesy of Berklee College of Music

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 3:40 pm

Of the young guitarists on New York's jazz scene, few are as highly tipped as Matthew Stevens. Best known for his role in Christian Scott's quintet, he's often drafted to execute the new visions of his peers, but also gets calls from veteran musicians like Terri Lyne Carrington and Dr. Lonnie Smith. Stevens also has a knack for writing and arranging, and will soon unveil his own debut recording as a bandleader.

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The Two-Way
6:29 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Two Days Later, World Vision Reverses Policy That Allowed Hiring Of Gays

Aid packages labled 'World Vision' for the victims of typhoon 'Haiyan' in the Philippines are loaded into a Lufthansa aircraft at Frankfurt International Airport in Germany.
Fredrik Von Erichsen DPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 6:49 pm

World Vision U.S. changed course on Wednesday, saying it would return to its policy of not hiring Christians in gay marriages.

The Washington-state-based charity caused an uproar among its supporters when it announced on Monday that based on the changes many churches were making, it would allow the hiring of avowed Christians who had been legally married to someone of the same sex.

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Shots - Health News
5:56 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:03 am

The symptoms of autism may not be obvious until a child is a toddler, but the disorder itself appears to begin well before birth.

Brain tissue taken from children who died and also happened to have autism revealed patches of disorganization in the cortex, a thin sheet of cells that's critical for learning and memory, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Tissue samples from children without autism didn't have those characteristic patches.

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All Tech Considered
5:56 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

From The Birth Of The iPhone To An Era Of Lawsuits

One of the earliest iPhone prototypes. This system was pieced together to test early versions of the iPhone's software.
Courtesy of Apple

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 7:24 pm

Next week Apple and Samsung are heading back to court. The two technology giants have been locked in an ongoing patent battle for years.

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Remembering The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
5:01 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Brings 'Bad Juju' And Pain 25 Years Later

Scott Pegau, a scientist at the Prince William Sound Science Center, studies the effects of spilled oil on the environment in Cordova, Alaska.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:54 pm

At Ross Mullins' home in Cordova, Alaska, you have to slam the front door extra hard to make it close. The former commercial fisherman lives in a small wood-frame house that's in need of repair. Some of the windows are cracked and he leaves the water faucets dripping to protect uninsulated pipes from the harsh Alaskan winter.

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground and started leaking oil 25 years ago, the disaster drastically changed the fishing industry in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Mullins has never recovered from that blow.

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