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4:05 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Cracked Dam Causes Water Emergency In Washington State

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In eastern Washington State, a massive hydroelectric dam on the Columbia River is cracked. Engineers have lowered the water upstream to relieve pressure on the structure. But the low water behind Wanapum Dam has alarmed nearby farmers. Some irrigation pipes are no longer reaching the river and the weather is about to heat up. The Northwest News Network's Anna King reports.

ANNA KING, BYLINE: Frosty Hansen is 74 but he drives his Kawasaki like he's 15 and has nothing to lose.

(SOUNDBITE OF ENGINE REVVING)

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Europe
4:05 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Obama And Pope Meet For First Time At The Vatican

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. President Obama has wrapped up a meeting in Vatican City with Pope Francis, the man who in just one year has become the world's spiritual superstar. Now, the elections of both men made history, Barack Obama as the first African-American president, and the Argentine-born Jorge Bergoglio became the first non-European pope in centuries.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:00 am
Thu March 27, 2014

The Kronos Quartet: Still Daring After All These Years

The Kronos Quartet (from left): David Harrington, John Sherba, Sunny Yang and Hank Dutt.
Jay Blakesberg Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

Kronos Quartet is celebrating 40 years of playing music together — and to mark the occasion, they're playing a celebration concert at Carnegie Hall in New York tomorrow night. Since their founding, the San Francisco-based string quartet has become one of the most visible ensembles in classical music. The players have done it by championing new and underheard music, and by coming up with a business model that was unheard of for a chamber group four decades ago.

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Parallels
1:58 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Crossing The Desert: Why Brenda Wanted Border Patrol To Find Her

Parts of the fence along the U.S.-Mexico border might stop vehicles, but they don't keep out those making the journey on foot.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

It's hard enough to drive through the Arizona desert, where the sun is harsh and the distances immense. This is the story of people who walk it.

In particular, it's the story of Brenda, who asked us to use only her first name. She told us yet another of the unbelievable stories you hear in the Borderland.

We met her in Nogales, Sonora, on the northern border of Mexico opposite Arizona. She was living in a shelter for deported people, where she told us of her brief and difficult stay in the United States.

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Theater
1:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

At 81, Playwright Athol Fugard Looks Back On Aging And Apartheid

In 1961, South African playwright Athol Fugard put black and white actors on stage together in his breakout play Blood Knot. He's pictured above in the 1970s.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

Under apartheid, trying to make an artistic political statement was difficult — artists were subject to scrutiny and even arrest. On the other hand, making a political statement was easy: All one had to do was put black and white actors on a stage together.

That's exactly what South African playwright Athol Fugard did back in 1961 with his breakout play Blood Knot. His newest play, The Shadow of the Hummingbird, is now onstage at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn.

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