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Music Reviews
6:56 am
Sat August 10, 2013

In West Virginia, A Band Camp Of Sorts Prizes Old-Time Music

Students jam at one of the Augusta Heritage Center's themed, week-long summer music camps.
Stephanie Coleman for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 6:43 am

A group of 20 students sits in a big circle in the front parlor of a Victorian mansion at Davis & Elkins College. Everyone has a fiddle. And all eyes are on the teacher. Heads bop and toes tap as Dave Bing plays a West Virginia tune called "Camp Chase." Outside, a bevy of banjos plink out a mournful melody. Down the road the mandolin and guitar classes combine to jam on a new tune they've learned.

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The Record
6:56 am
Sat August 10, 2013

'Something Being Born': On Making A Classic Album With A Boombox

More than 10 years ago, John Darnielle of The Mountain Goats made a career-defining record with the crudest possible tools.
D.L. Anderson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 6:43 am

John Darnielle was a little lonely when he wrote the songs on All Hail West Texas, the 2002 album that became a highlight of his music career. His band, The Mountain Goats, is a trio now, but back then it was a one-man show. Darnielle would come home from the long, dragging hours of his healthcare job, alone in his house while his wife was away at hockey camp. He'd sit down on his couch with his guitar, cobble together some words and music, and hit record on his Panasonic boombox.

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Author Interviews
6:56 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Contested Memories Find Common Ground In 'The Storied South'

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 6:43 am

For four decades, William Ferris tracked down some of the most inspirational artists and historians of the American South. He sat down with Eudora Welty, Alice Walker, Pete Seeger, Bobby Rush and Alex Haley, capturing their reflections on tape and their images on camera.

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Science
6:56 am
Sat August 10, 2013

When Power Goes To Your Head, It May Shut Out Your Heart

Neuroscientists have found evidence to suggest feeling powerful dampens a part of our brain that helps with empathy.
Vladgrin istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 8:52 am

Even the smallest dose of power can change a person. You've probably seen it. Someone gets a promotion or a bit of fame and then, suddenly, they're a little less friendly to the people beneath them.

So here's a question that may seem too simple: Why?

If you ask a psychologist, he or she may tell you that the powerful are simply too busy. They don't have the time to fully attend to their less powerful counterparts.

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StoryCorps
6:56 am
Sat August 10, 2013

How Two Veterans Helped Each Other With A Second Chance

Marine Cpl. Paul Wayman, left, and former Navy SEAL Nathanael Roberti met through a program in California that helps veterans readjust to civilian life.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 6:43 am

Marine Cpl. Paul Wayman and former Navy SEAL Nathanael Roberti met in 2012, after finding themselves in front of a special court for veterans.

The court takes into account the specific struggles that service members face, so the judge gave each of them a choice: go to prison, or enroll in a program that helps veterans readjust to civilian life.

They chose to go through the program, Veterans Village of San Diego, located in a California live-in facility.

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