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Author Interviews
5:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

'The Last Refuge': Fighting Al-Qaida In Yemen

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 11:36 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
5:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

'A Royal Affair' That Grew A Danish Revolution

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 11:36 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time, now, another story you have probably never heard before; this one though, absolutely true.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NIKOLAJ ARCEL: There's this young, beautiful British princess. She's married off to a king in Denmark who she hasn't even met.

MARTIN: This is Nikolaj Arcel. He's a Danish filmmaker. And his latest movie is about the king of Denmark back in the late 1700s, and of course, that beautiful princess who is shipped off to a foreign land.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "A ROYAL AFFAIR")

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Author Interviews
5:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

Philip Pullman: Rewriting The Brothers Grimm

Courtesy of Viking

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 11:02 am

Two hundred years after the Brothers Grimm first published Children's and Household Tales, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are getting another rewrite.

Philip Pullman, who wrote The Golden Compass of the young-adult fantasy series His Dark Materials, took on the challenge of retelling 50 of the original Grimm stories for his latest book, Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm.

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Author Interviews
4:46 am
Sun November 11, 2012

'Heat' Imagines Life After 'Madame Butterfly'

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 11:36 am

The second act of Puccini's opera Madama Butterfly opens with the aching aria "Un Bel Di," one of the most famous in the Italian repertoire. Onstage, an abandoned young woman sings longingly for "one fine day" when her lover might return to her and their young son in Nagasaki, Japan.

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The Salt
4:45 am
Sun November 11, 2012

Wild Turkeys Gobble Their Way To A Comeback

European settlers almost wiped out North America's native wild turkey. But conservation efforts have proved successful. There are now nearly 7 million birds found across 49 states.
Larry Price, National Wild Turkey Federation NWTF.org

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 2:38 pm

Wild turkeys and buffalo have more in common than you might guess. Both were important as food for Native Americans and European settlers. And both were nearly obliterated.

There were a couple of reasons for the turkey's decline. In the early years of the U.S., there was no regulation, so people could shoot as many turkeys as they liked. And their forest habitat was cut down for farmland and heating fuel. Without trees, turkeys have nowhere to roost. So they began to disappear.

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