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Law
12:49 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

CIA's Ex-Con Code Thief Reflects On His Career

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:49 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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On Aging
12:49 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Taking The Car Keys Away From Older Drivers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:24 pm

For older drivers and their families, the conversation about giving up the car keys can be wrenching. Driving, for many, means independence and the transition to life without a car can be challenging, particularly for those who live alone or in areas with limited access to public transportation.

Monkey See
12:40 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Money Is The Object And The Subject In History's 'The Men Who Built America'

History identifies these men in its press materials as "Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and J.P. Morgan." They are committing to the bit.
Zach Dilgard History

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The Salt
12:33 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Sandwich Monday: The Candwich

And for the Holidays, try Thanksgiving In A Bucket.
NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:51 pm

Welcome Salt readers! We're Sandwich Monday, a regular feature from the staff of "Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me," and we're moving in here to provide an antidote to the informative and insightful posts to which you're accustomed.

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A Blog Supreme
12:31 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

'Treme,' Ep. 25: Sugar Boy's Salute

Big Chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters, center) has his Mardi Gras Indian practice interrupted by a visit from members of the Creole Wild West tribe.
Paul Schiraldi HBO

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:41 pm

If you're one of the few viewers still confused about what Treme is saying about art, do note this episode's "play-within-a-play" staging of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. The existentialist play revolves around two characters, Vladimir (nicknamed Didi) and Estragon (called Gogo), who wait interminably for a mysterious "Godot" by a desolate country road. It's clearly meant to parallel New Orleans residents' wait for essential social services, complete with the barren backdrop of the city post-Katrina.

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