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It's All Politics
8:56 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Should TV Stations Refuse To Air Political Ads That Make False Claims?

If a television or radio station determines that a political ad is false, should it refuse to run the ad?

That's exactly what the nonpartisan group Free Press is calling on stations to do.

"They certainly could reject some of them," said Matt Wood, the group's policy director.

At the very least, they could do more fact checking, he said.

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Favorite Sessions
8:41 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Cyrus Chestnut: Nobody Like 'The Nutman'

Cyrus Chestnut performs on Jazz24.
Justin Steyer Jazz24

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 3:37 pm

Pianist Cyrus Chestnut took his time making a name for himself on the jazz scene: For a decade starting in the mid-1980s, he apprenticed as pianist for Jon Hendricks, Betty Carter, Donald Harrison and Wynton Marsalis. But since then, he's toured the world and recorded 15 albums as a bandleader.

In this performance and interview, Cyrus describes his gospel roots and his discovery of jazz, and discusses how he approaches interpreting other composers' music.

Set List

  • "Tonk"
  • "Polka Dots And Moonbeams"
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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Second Chance: Adam Greenberg Strikes Out, Gets A Standing Ovation

Adam Greenberg of the Miami Marlins hugs manager Ozzie Guillen after striking out against the New York Mets.
Marc Serota Getty Images

It's rare that a batter receives a standing ovation for a three-pitch strikeout. But that's exactly what happened last night in Miami.

Adam Greenberg came to the plate in a big-league uniform seven years after his only major-league at bat. As Mark told us last week, Greenberg was a Chicago Cub in 2005 making his major league debut against the Marlins.

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The Two-Way
7:26 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Senate Panels Finds Anti-Terror, Data-Sharing Centers Were Useless

At a fusion center in Las Vegas workers like Daniel Burns, a program coordinator, analyze suspicious activity reports.
Monica Lam Center for Investigative Reporting

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 10:11 am

An effort to share counter-terrorism intelligence across federal and local law enforcement has turned out to be a useless and expensive exercise that also put Americans' civil liberties at risk, a newly-released Senate subcommittee report (pdf) finds.

The scathing nature of the report is perhaps best summed up by the testimony of Harold "Skip" Vandover, who headed the reporting branch of the Department of Homeland Security.

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The Two-Way
6:47 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Obama Vs. Romney: It's Debate Night In Denver

University student Dia Mohamed gets a wireless microphone put on his tie as he stands in for President Barack Obama during rehearsal for the first presidential debate in the Ritchie Center at the University of Denver on Tuesday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Good morning! The big story today is of course the first presidential debate between President Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

The big picture is that this is Romney's opportunity to tighten a race with a little more than a month to go before the Nov. 6 elections.

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