NPR News

Pages

U.S.
3:41 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Why Does China Want A Mural In Oregon Destroyed?

This pro-Tibet mural in downtown Corvallis is at the center of a dispute between the town's mayor and the Chinese government.
Chris Lehman for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:09 pm

The mural in downtown Corvallis, Ore., is big: 10 feet high and 100 feet long. One side shows a peaceful countryside setting in rural Taiwan. The other shows police beating protesters in Tibet and a Buddhist monk setting himself ablaze in protest.

Read more
All Songs Considered Blog
3:20 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Watch A Gorgeous New Animated Video For Wilco's 'Sunloathe'

'Sunloathe' from Wilco, with illustrations by Nathaniel Murphy
Nathaniel Murphy youtube

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 10:08 am

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:12 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Tiny Bubbles: Injectable Oxygen Foam Tested For Emergency Care

Bubbles of oxygen injected as a foam might someday help patients live long enough to get treatment for oxygen deprivation.
iStockphoto.com

A lot of medicine's direst emergencies come down to one problem: lack of oxygen.

Cardiologist John Kheir started thinking about that when a little girl in his care, drowning from lung hemorrhages, died before she could be hooked up to a heart-lung machine that would have kept her blood oxygenated while the damage was repaired.

Read more
Wednesdays Become Eclectic
3:10 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

KCRW Presents: Antibalas

KCRW

Originally published on Sat October 6, 2012 10:29 am

The Brooklyn collective Antibalas recently played a live set for KCRW on one of Los Angeles' hottest summer days. The 11-piece band is one of the leading purveyors of Afrobeat music and didn't disappoint, bringing the heat throughout a seamless four-song jam, of which we present "Dirty Money" here. The group spends a lot of time on the road, and you can see plenty of evidence of that in this performance.

Read more
The Salt
2:42 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

FDA Weighs Federal Standard To Limit Exposure To Arsenic In Rice

A combine harvests rice near Tucker, Ark., as consumer groups pressure the FDA to set federal standards on arsenic in rice.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:09 pm

Scientists have known for a long time that rice — often babies' first food and the staple of much of the world's diet — is good at absorbing inorganic arsenic from soil during the growing process.

Two separate analyses, one by Consumer Reports and one by the Food and Drug Administration, have raised concerns that we might be getting too much of this known human carcinogen in our diets.

Read more

Pages