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House & Senate Races
4:56 am
Sat September 29, 2012

Utah House Candidates Both Have The 'Right Strategy'

Mia Love, the mayor of Saratoga Springs, Utah, addresses the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 28. She's running for Congress against incumbent Democrat Jim Matheson.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 3:53 pm

In Utah, the state's lone Democratic congressman is in a tough battle for a seventh term. Jim Matheson's opponent, Mia Love, has the support of national GOP superstars and, if elected, would become the first black Republican woman in Congress.

In a state where only about 25 percent of residents vote as Democrats, Matheson has successfully gotten enough Republicans to vote for him and keep him in office for the past 12 years. He can trace his political roots back to his father, Scott Matheson, the state's last Democratic governor.

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Around the Nation
4:55 am
Sat September 29, 2012

L.A. Sheriff Rebuked For Alleged Inmate Abuse

County Sheriff Lee Baca faces what may be the toughest fight of his 14-year political career.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 2:23 pm

Los Angeles County's sheriff is under fire. A blue-ribbon commission issued a scathing report Friday accusing Sheriff Lee Baca of failing to address long-standing allegations of inmate abuse in his jails. The accusations include deputies beating inmates, cover-ups and a persistent culture of violence.

The sheriff has been able to weather many storms during his 14-year tenure, but this may be the toughest fight of his political career.

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Europe
4:52 am
Sat September 29, 2012

Greeks Battle To 'Survive' Amid New Budget Proposal

People with disabilities take part in a march against the government's new austerity measures in central Athens on Thursday.
Petros Giannakouris AP

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 10:25 pm

The Greek government is set to present a new austerity budget on Monday that's supposed to please the institutions that are lending billions to the country to save it from bankruptcy.

But the cuts also come at a time when a deep recession has dragged into its fifth year. More than a third of businesses in Greece have closed, and nearly a quarter of Greeks are unemployed.

Busking For The Next Generation

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Science
6:56 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Scientist Cleared In Polar Bear Controversy

Polar bears in the Beaufort Sea in northern Alaska. Scientist Charles Monnett caused a stir with a 2006 report on polar bears that were drowning, apparently owing to a lack of ice.
Steve Amstrup Fish and Wildlife Service

A long, controversial investigation of a polar bear scientist has ended with his government employer saying it does not look like he engaged in any scientific misconduct.

Charles Monnett is a wildlife researcher with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, part of the Department of the Interior. He and a colleague, Jeffrey Gleason, wrote an influential 2006 report describing apparently drowned polar bears floating in the Arctic, which they saw during a routine aerial survey of whales.

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Deceptive Cadence
6:48 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

In Ohio, A Three-Way Musical Marriage Of Convenience

The Dayton Opera and Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra perform Beethoven's Fidelio in January 2011 at the Benjamin and Maria Schuster Performing Arts Center in Dayton, Ohio.
Courtesy of the Dayton Performing Arts Alliance

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 12:51 pm

Symphony orchestras across the country are in turmoil. Musicians in Chicago went on strike (an action that ended on Sept. 24 with a new tentative agreement reached), their counterparts in Atlanta were locked out (with a new agreement reached on Sept. 26). Contracts for both the Minneapolis Orchestra and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra recently expired, and all sides seem to be at an impasse.

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