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Economy
2:22 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Euro Currency Still Faring Well, For Now

Over the last 13 years, the euro has been worth on average $1.21, only a penny less than its current price of $1.22 per euro.
Michael Probst AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 11:42 am

The euro touched a two-year low against the dollar Tuesday, as concerns about the eurozone debt crisis continued.

Despite a recession across much of the eurozone and even predictions of the currency's demise, however, the euro has held up relatively well during this crisis.

Over the last 13 year, it has taken on average $1.21 to buy a euro. Now, even in this midst of this crisis, it's worth virtually the same ($1.22).

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World
2:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Spanish Families Share Expenses And Tradition

A woman pushes a pram though the Plaza de Murillo on July 3 in Madrid. Spain's custom for multiple families to live under the same roof has tied them closer together as well as their wallets. The country has the highest unemployment rate in the Eurozone, and government benefits help aid those out of work.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 8:48 pm

What used to be a Spanish tradition is now becoming more of an economic necessity.

In Spain, the social safety net that helps people survive the economic crisis has two parts: government benefits and close family ties. The country has the highest rate in Europe of multi-generational families all living together.

With a quarter of Spaniards out of work, more parents pick up their kids from school themselves, in the middle of what would have been a workday.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Will Medicaid Bring The Uninsured Out Of The Woodwork?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is the latest state executive to say no to an expansion of Medicaid.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 3:54 pm

Ever since the Supreme Court decided last month that an expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act should be optional, quite a few Republican governors have been vowing to take a pass.

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The Salt
2:20 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Cool Down With A Hot Drink? It's Not As Crazy As You Think

Joe Palca serves up some hot tea on a very hot day at Teaism in Washington, D.C., last week.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 8:47 pm

Hot tea on a hot day? Not for me, thank you. Not my idea of how to cool down.

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World
2:19 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Venezuela Begins Debate On Future Without Chavez

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, seen speaking during a TV program in Caracas on June 15, will compete with former opposition governor Henrique Capriles and other candidates in October's presidential elections.
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:45 am

In Venezuela, people are beginning to talk about what was once unthinkable: Just who could succeed the all-powerful President Hugo Chavez?

He has been battling cancer, which for much of this year forced him to suspend his once-frequent TV appearances. On Monday, Chavez declared himself free of the cancer, though it's not the first time he's said he was cured.

For 13 years, he has consolidated his hold on power while nationalizing farmland and seizing private companies. And now, despite his infrequent appearances, he remains a political force.

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