Arnie Seipel

Arnie Seipel delivers weather forecasts five times daily on NPR Berlin. He is also a producer for NPR’s coverage of U.S. elections. Arnie previously worked as a production assistant with the promotions department at NPR, as well as the live events unit. He worked on NPR's Talk of the Nation before that.

Arnie’s career in broadcasting began at CBS News where he was an intern for CBSNews.com. He graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in Government and Politics in 2008.

The Ted Cruz and John Kasich campaigns announced apparent coordinated strategies to combat Donald Trump in select upcoming primaries — an effort to force an open convention when the Republican National Committee gathers in Cleveland in July. In a statement sent out Sunday evening, the Cruz campaign said it will focus resources on Indiana, "and in turn clear the path for Gov. Kasich to compete in Oregon and New Mexico." Kasich's camp offered an inverse statement within minutes, saying it will ...

President Obama wants to close the prison at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay before leaving office. But his departing defense secretary, Chuck Hagel, told NPR News the job is "going to be very difficult" to complete in that time. Hagel made that remark in an exit interview Friday, one of only a handful he granted as he prepared to vacate his expansive office at the Pentagon. The interview will air Monday on Morning Edition . His office looks across the Potomac toward the Capitol — where...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dnwvegQ7JI http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rijpU5yD55I This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America. Millennials are not getting much love from politicians this year. The big reason for that is low expectations for turnout among young voters. Back in 2010, the last midterm election, fewer than a quarter of voters ages 18 to 29 showed up at the polls. This year, it's looking even worse: 23 percent of voters under 30 are expected to vote....

Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Some sad news this morning: The world has lost a literary giant. Author Ray Bradbury died last night after a long illness. He was 91 years old. He wrote such classics as "The Martian Chronicles" and "Fahrenheit 451" - futuristic tales from a man who never used a computer, or even drove a car. NPR's Arnie Seipel has more on Bradbury and his curious life. ARNIE SEIPEL, BYLINE: Ray Bradbury grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people...

Ray Bradbury, author of The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451, died Tuesday. He was 91. Bradbury was known for his futuristic tales — but he never used a computer, or even drove a car. Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill., in 1920 and grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people couldn't imagine the future, and his active imagination made him stand out. He once told Fresh Air 's Terry Gross about exaggerating basic childhood fears, like monsters at the top of the...