Ina Jaffe

Ina Jaffe is a National desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Culver City, Calif.

Covering California and the West, Jaffe has reported on nearly all of the major news events, elections, and natural disasters in the region. Currently, she covers issues related to aging. She also reports on regional and national politics, contributing election coverage in 2008, 2010, and 2012.

In addition to captivating and informing listeners, Jaffe's reports have garnered critical acclaim. Her 2012 investigation into how the West Los Angeles VA made millions from renting property while ignoring plans to house homeless veterans won an award from the Society of Professional Journalists as well as a Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media. A few months after the story aired, the West Los Angeles VA broke ground on supportive housing for homeless vets.

Jaffe's 2011 series on rising violence in California State Psychiatric Hospitals was also honored with a Gracie Award as well as awards from Investigative Reporters and Editors and the American Bar Association. Her three-part series on California's Three Strikes sentencing law won the ABA's Silver Gavel Award in 2010, as well as the Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Before moving to Los Angeles, Jaffe was the first editor of Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon which made its debut in 1985.

Born in Chicago, Jaffe attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison and DePaul University receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees in philosophy, respectively.

Pages

Around the Nation
2:28 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Los Angeles VA Has Made Millions On Rental Deals

The 388-acre campus of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in West Los Angeles was donated to the federal government more than 100 years ago for use as a home for disabled veterans, but is no longer used for that purpose. In 2007, Building 209, pictured here, was designated as a place to house disabled homeless vets. It is currently abandoned.
Nancy Pastor for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 6:59 pm

Most Los Angeles residents only know the Veterans Affairs medical center in West Los Angeles as something they glimpse from their cars when they're on traffic-choked Wilshire Boulevard. From the road it looks like a park, but within the grounds is the largest medical facility in the VA's health care system.

Read more
The Record
3:54 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

He'll Retune Your Living Room

Tomasz Zajaczkowski iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 5:11 pm

Want better sound from your home music system? Electrical engineering professor Chris Kyriakakis says it might not be your stereo components that are the problem — it might be your home.

Kyriakakis, who is the principal investigator at the Immersive Audio Lab at the University of Southern California, has spent years figuring out how to make the experience of listening to recorded sound as close to what you hear in a live performance as possible.

Read more
Art & Design
4:21 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

340 Tons Of Art: 'Levitated Mass' To Rock L.A.

A 2011 sketch by artist Michael Heizer shows the walkway visitors will use to pass under the granite boulder at the center of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's installation. (Click here to enlarge.)
Courtesy of Michael Heizer

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 8:39 am

Los Angeles has a new rock star — a 340-ton boulder perched above a long walk-through trench at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The installation, called Levitated Mass, is a new work by artist Michael Heizer that opens to the public on June 24.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:27 am
Sun April 29, 2012

After L.A. Riots, An Effort To Rebuild A Broken City

A fire burns out of control at the corner of 67th St. and West Blvd. in South Central Los Angeles on April 30, 1992. Hundreds of buildings burned when riots erupted after the verdicts in the Rodney King case were announced.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 11:33 am

The Los Angeles riots began 20 years ago Sunday, when a jury acquitted four police officers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King in 1992.

While the ashes were still smoldering, then-Mayor Tom Bradley announced a new organization that would repair the shattered city, Rebuild L.A. Its mission was to spend five years harnessing the power of the private sector to replace and improve on what was lost. While it created a lot of hope, it created even more disappointment.

Read more

Pages