Paul Hunton

Production Director

Paul Hunton is the Station Manager for Texas Tech Public Television where he oversees day to day operations. He is also the creator and host of the PBS Digital Series, 24 Frames, which has been nominated for an EMMY award 3 times. Paul also serves as a staff senator at TTU, on the Board of Directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters Lubbock and Plainview and teaches Video Production in the College of Media and Communication.

Ways To Connect

Austin Wideman is the Director of Photography for Between Earth and Sky. He's currently about to start his last semester at Texas Tech University where he'll graduate from the College of Media and Communication. He's wise beyond his years and as skilled as they come. He is a natural behind the camera and can work under any conditions thrown at him. For this project he had to learn 4K Cinema utilizing 2 Panasonic GH4s as well as learn how to operate a DJI Inspire 1 4K drone. He's a natural and adapted quickly to the arduous shooting conditions of Alaska. 

David Weindorf, Ph.D. is the Executive Producer of Between Earth and Sky. He approached Texas Tech Public Media in the spring of 2015 with an idea he was very passionate about. A soil scientist, Dr. Weindorf had been on the Arctic Soil Field Tour in Alaska with Chien-Lu Ping, Ph.D. multiple times and knew how important and valuable the field tour was to not only the science of soil but to our understanding of climate change. David had already crafted a draft of what the film could look like and one thing he was sure of was that Dr.

The driving force behind Between Earth and Sky is Chien-Lu Ping's Arctic Soil Field Tour course conducted by the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. Here is a description of the class from UAF's website: 

Over the course of the production we haven't just been interviewing scientists. Business owners, train conductors, and what we might call just ordinary citizens, have all been included in the film. One of the most unique perspectives we've gotten has come from those who farm the Last Frontier. Alaskan farmers have a unique perspective on just about everything, but one insight we were most interested in was how weather is affecting farming in the state. Not all of which is negative, later winters and earlier summers mean longer growing seasons.