Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
9:23 am
Tue April 16, 2013

IMF Lowers 2013 Economic Growth Forecasts

The IMF says economic woes in places like Cyprus will tamp down global growth.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 11:30 am

The International Monetary Fund has lowered its projections for global economic growth, including in the United States, citing sharp cuts in government spending and the struggling eurozone.

The Washington, D.C.-based international lender's World Economic Outlook shaved its 2013 forecast to 3.3 percent from 3.5 percent. It also trimmed its projection for 2014 to 4 percent from 4.1 percent.

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The Two-Way
7:58 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Social Media Helped Find Loved Ones After Marathon Bombing

A runner uses his cellphone after two bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon on Monday.
Alex Trautwig Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 11:22 am

In the chaos and mayhem that followed the Boston Marathon bombing, many people were frantic to learn the fate of friends and loved ones who were either in the race or watched it from the sidelines.

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The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Ford, GM Will Jointly Develop Fuel-Efficient Transmissions

Schematic of the current generation of six-speed transmissions co-developed by GM and Ford.
GM Wieck

Rivals Ford and General Motors said Monday they will work together to develop new transmissions aimed at helping them meet upcoming fuel efficiency standards.

The new 9-speed transmissions for front-wheel-drive vehicles and 10 speeds for rear-drive and SUVs and trucks are expected to reach the market by 2016.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Dish Network Makes $25 Billion Bid For Sprint

Sprint now has two suitors: Japan's SoftBank and Colorado-based Dish Network.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:36 am

Satellite TV distributor Dish Network has offered to buy telecom giant Sprint Nextel Corp. in a $25.5 billion deal, a move that could derail a similar offer by the Japanese phone company SoftBank.

Dish says that it has offered $17.3 billion in cash and $8.2 billion in stock for Sprint. After the news was announced on Monday, Sprint's stock jumped 15 percent in pre-market trading, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Mon April 15, 2013

FAA Orders Inspection Of Boeing 737s

An American Airlines 737-800 aircraft in January. The 737-800 is one of several variants the FAA has ordered to be inspected.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:45 am

Federal aviation officials have ordered that more than 1,000 Boeing 737s be examined to see if a key part on the plane's tail section needs to be replaced, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued the airworthiness directive for a pin that holds the 737's horizontal stabilizer to the rest of the tail, to see if it is in danger of failing prematurely. The horizontal stabilizer — also known as the tail plane — enables the pilot to control the aircraft's pitch.

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