All Things Considered on KTTZ-FM

Weekdays from 4-7pm on 89.1FM and online
Host: Michele Norris, Robert Siegel, & Melissa Block
Brandi Blake

The most listened to, afternoon drive-time, news-program in the country.

Join 89.1 FM and All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Michelle Norris and Melissa Block for 2-hours of the day's biggest stories along with thoughtful commentaries and insightful features.       

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a161e1c8673a30ed05a7|5182a15ae1c8673a30ed0589

Pages

Business
3:52 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

More Companies Encourage Workers To Volunteer, On The Clock

Kristin Yentes (right) and other volunteers from U.S. Bank serve breakfast to diners at Catholic Charities Opportunity Center in Minneapolis. Workers from the bank have been volunteering with Catholic Charities for more than a year.
Jeffrey Thompson MPR

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 7:40 am

You're not likely to find many bankers wearing those old stereotypical green visors these days. But at U.S. Bank, some employees sport hairnets — at least when they're serving breakfast.

Every Friday morning, a group of U.S. Bank employees stands elbow to elbow at a Minneapolis soup kitchen, doling out French toast, sausage and other breakfast goodies. Most of the people getting free breakfast are homeless men who lug their belongings in plastic bags.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

'Nothing Racist' Implied In 'Obama' Act, Says Rodeo Clown

A photo taken of the clown who wore a mask resembling President Obama during a rodeo Saturday at the Missouri State Fair.
Jameson Hsieh AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 7:40 am

Tuffy Gessling, the rodeo clown at the center of the controversy over the skit at the Missouri State Fair in which a man wearing a President Obama mask was mocked, says "nothing racist was ever implied."

Read more
Parallels
12:13 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S.
Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 7:40 am

For roughly two decades, the Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts. These rafts, especially the high-end model F470, are not the recreational rafts you take out to the lake on a Sunday, says Lionel Boudeau, the head of Zodiac's North America operations.

"It is used for a large variety of missions, like assault landings, infiltration and exfiltration," he says. "It can be deployed from the shore or deployed from the air by an aircraft, a helicopter, by a submarine. It is used by special forces and regular Army."

Read more
The Salt
5:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

In Iraq, Laying Claim To The Kebab

Many different Middle Eastern cultures claim to have invented the kebab.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 8:54 pm

When you hear the word "kebab" in America, you might think of skewers with chunks of chicken or beef and vegetables, marinated and grilled on coals or gas. But say "kebab" in the Middle East, and it means a lot of things — chunks of lamb or liver on skewers, or the more popular version of grilled ground meat logs found in Turkey, Iran and much of the Arab world.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp

Owen Chilcoat hacking his tablet. "I am just messing around ... trying to break it," he says.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:56 am

At r00tz, a camp that takes place each year during the Def Con convention in Las Vegas, children learn to pick locks, hack smart TVs and, most important, how to take apart and understand the technology that surrounds them.

The scene inside the camp a couple weeks ago was a bit of a madhouse — controlled chaos. Little kids everywhere. Brendan Herman was trying to program a machine to draw pictures on ping-pong balls, wearing a tinfoil hat.

"To protect me from aliens," he said.

Read more

Pages