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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

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Europe
6:55 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Netherlands Celebrates Queen Beatrix

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:51 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Calif. City Debates Location Of Stone Head

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

National Security
5:47 am
Tue May 1, 2012

White House Official Acknowledges Drone Strikes

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The president's counterterrorism chief, John Brennan, made another statement yesterday. He argued that drone strikes to kill militants are legal.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Brennan's remarks were unusual. It's rare that the administration mentions drones at all. Yesterday, Brennan chose to say that the missile strikes by unmanned aircraft which take place in countries like Yemen and Pakistan fit within international law.

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Business
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Bank Of America To Lay Off More Workers

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with more job cuts at Bank of America.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The Wall Street Journal reports that the nation's second-largest bank is planning about 2,000 layoffs at its investment banking, commercial banking and wealth management units. These cuts are notable because they include high-earning employees in operations that account for most of Bank of America's profits since the financial crisis.

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Business
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Siemens Changes Its Culture: No More Bribes

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 5:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Wal-Mart faces many questions after The New York Times reported that the company's expansion in Mexico involved systematic bribery. It is not, however, the first corporation to face this problem.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Years ago, Siemens - the giant German manufacturing firm - faced an even bigger scandal. Siemens is a little like General Electric. It seems to make everything everywhere, from security equipment to locomotives.

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