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Business
6:15 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Flight Attendants Ratify Pact With American Airlines

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:52 pm

American is currently seeking to cut costs in bankruptcy protection so the flight attendants' union pushed hard for this vote — warning that rejecting the contract could mean even deeper cuts or furloughs. The company's trying to cut about a billion dollars in labor costs. Mechanics and other union workers had previously accepted new contracts but pilots rejected American's latest offer earlier this month.

Around the Nation
6:15 am
Mon August 20, 2012

N.Y. Library's Toilet Paper To Feature Ads

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Europe
6:15 am
Mon August 20, 2012

BBC Weatherman Apologizes For Inaccurate Forecast

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
4:19 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Janesville Library Prepared For Inquiring Reporters

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

For the residents of Janesville, Wisconsin, Mitt Romney's selection of Paul Ryan as his running mate was a story of a local man becoming the biggest news in the country. But for the librarians of Janesville, it meant something else entirely, as NPR's Don Gonyea found out last week.

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Asia
3:38 am
Mon August 20, 2012

India Accuses Pakistani Websites Of Inciting Panic

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:50 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

India's government has persuaded companies to shut down more than 150 websites. Authorities blame those sites for circulating claims that led to panic. The claims fueled fears of violence during the Muslim festival of Eid. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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