From Our Own Correspondent on KTTZ-HD2

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/default.stm

Podcasts

  • Saturday, September 17, 2016 6:08am
    Kate Adie introduces dispatches from writers and correspondents around the world. This week: Kevin Connolly reports from Bratislava as EU leaders have a perfectly normal get-together - except someone's missing; Sebastian Usher chronicles the war of words between Saudi Arabia and Iran during the Hajj; Jenny Hill visits Hamburg to discover if Mrs Merkel is right to say Germany "can do it" as it tries to absorb its large influx of migrants; Stephanie Hegarty tells the story of shocked shop owners in Lagos and their dramatic tussle with the local authorities; and what Adam Shaw learnt when he met aspiring techies in St Louis.
  • Saturday, September 10, 2016 6:00am
    Kate Adie introduces dispatches from writers and correspondents around the world. This week: Yolande Knell reports on the boom in civil marriages on Cyprus - for couples from Lebanon and Israel; Roger Hearing reveals what happened when he fell foul of the Russian authorities at the border with North Korea; Jannat Jalil speaks to townspeople in Calais about the impact of the continuing crisis at the so-called Jungle migrant camp; Monica Whitlock considers how lasting Islam Karimov’s influence will be in Uzbekistan; and Nick Thorpe assesses what the Turkish and Hungarian celebrations of the 450th anniversary of the Battle of Szigetvar say about relations between the two countries.
  • Saturday, September 3, 2016 6:00am
    Kate Adie introduces dispatches from writers and correspondents around the world. This week: As the latest summit of the Group of 20 leading nations takes place in China this weekend, Carrie Gracie profiles the historic city of Hangzhou which will host the meetings of the heads of government and central bank governors. Wyre Davies considers the vote of the Brazilian Senate to impeach Dilma Rousseff and whether the change at the top of the country's politics amounts to a coup. Katerina Vittozzi reports from the Central African Republic on her meeting with the victim of a brutal sexual assault. With Pyongyang holding its first international beer festival, Stephen Evans considers how the drink is a surprisingly unifying facet of life in North and South Korea. And David Willis in Los Angeles ponders whether errant American Olympian, Ryan Lochte, may yet be rehabilitated by dancing with the stars.
  • Saturday, August 27, 2016 6:00am
    Kate Adie introduces dispatches from writers and correspondents around the world. This week: a special insight into the extraordinary number of recent deaths in the Philippines as Jonathan Head talks to one of the country's hired killers; Mark Tully discovers how the "war on drugs" - particularly heroin - in Punjab is going; in the United States, Linda Pressly goes on call with an Ohio coroner dealing with the explosion in the number of deaths resulting from overdoses of prescription drugs and heroin supplied on the street; Justin Rowlatt gets early warning of a possible coup in the Maldives and heads for the island paradise; and Caroline Juler discovers how to improve medical care in Romania as doctors and nurses are drawn to jobs in other countries.
  • Saturday, August 20, 2016 6:00am
    Kate Adie introduces dispatches from writers and correspondents around the world. This week: Mark Lowen gauges the mood in Turkey today - and detects a hardening of public opinion against anyone thought to be associated with the attempted coup in July as well as an anti-Western backlash. Seref Isler was part of the BBC team covering those events and recalls what it was like to witness "the night no-one slept". Stephen Sackur's been to Attawapiskat and Calgary to hear of the very modern challenges threatening the survival of Canada's historic First Nations people: can the new Canadian Prime Minister's promises to help these communities be kept? In a Dakar nightclub, Nicola Kelly meets some aspiring DJs and hears their ideas on how to keep Senegalese young people from risking their lives on risky emigrant routes. And Martin Buckley is on the beaches of Corsica to learn why this island - along with the rest of France - has been convulsed with concern over the burkini.