Have you ever tried to organize a reunion for some of your old school friends? Everybody's scattered to various parts of the world, busy with their own lives; it makes you wonder if it's all worth it. The seven solo artists who sometimes get together as Doomtree can relate.

The late 1960s and early '70s defined a vibrant, electrifying and psychedelic era for rock music everywhere — including Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge communist movement put an end to that when it took power in 1975, but the music from that era has been discovered and rediscovered over the years.

Singing in harmony is an intimate exercise, not least because it often requires singers to change their voices in order to better blend with their counterparts. Kanene Pipkin grew up harmony singing, but says the first time she sang with her bandmates in The Lone Bellow, she noticed something unusual: She didn't need to alter her voice at all.

In 2005, jazz composer and french horn player Tom Varner left New York for Seattle, where he put together a nine-piece band of local players. Their new album is called Nine Surprises. Fresh Air jazz critic Kevin Whitehead says that Varner can really write, and they can really play.

Since 2005, Brooklyn's Budos Band has helped define and develop the modern Afro-soul sound for which Daptone Records is known. The group's previous albums have been heavily influenced by Ethiopian jazz. But on the new Burnt Offering, the 10-piece band has taken cues from '60s- and '70s-era psychedelia and hard rock. Songs like "The Sticks," performed live for KCRW's Morning Becomes Eclectic, showcase this new side.