Music

Song Travels
1:37 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

John Proulx On 'Song Travels'

John Proulx.
Courtesy of the artist

Vocalist, pianist and composer John Proulx has a voice that recalls another great all-around musician, the late Chet Baker.

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NPR Story
12:09 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Marian McPartland On Piano Jazz, Part Two

Piano Jazz continues with part two of a monumental session (here's part one), as host Marian McPartland sits down as a guest on the program with guest host Elvis Costello. In this all-new interview, McPartland and Costello celebrate more moments from 30-plus years of Piano Jazz.

Beginnings In England

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Music Reviews
11:29 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Rosanne Cash: Seeking A 'Thread' Through Southern History

Rosanne Cash.
Clay Patrick McBride Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 1:30 pm

For the past two decades, Rosanne Cash has lived with her family in Manhattan, but in 2008, she was asked if she wanted to help with a project to restore the childhood home of her father, Johnny Cash, in the small town of Dyess, Ark. She agreed and went down there to do some fundraising — and in the process, she and her husband, producer-songwriter-guitarist John Leventhal, took some car trips throughout the South, soaking up history and music.

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Remembrances
4:44 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Amiri Baraka's Legacy Both Controversial And Achingly Beautiful

Amiri Baraka, shown here in 1972, was a renowned poet whose politics strongly shaped his work.
Julian C. Wilson AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 9:31 am

One of America's most important — and controversial — literary figures, Amiri Baraka, died on Thursday from complications after surgery following a long illness, according to his oldest son. Baraka was 79.

Baraka co-founded the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. His literary legacy is as complicated as the times he lived through, from his childhood — where he recalled not being allowed to enter a segregated library — to the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. His poem about that attack, "Somebody Blew Up America," quickly became infamous.

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Music Interviews
3:26 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

This Expensive Rubber Mat Could Be The Synth Of The Future

Fitted with rubbery keys and advanced electronics, the Seaboard was designed to realistically mimic other instruments by letting players pull off subtle bends and slides between notes.
Roli

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 9:06 am

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