Music

Music Interviews
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

Nash, Ronstadt Remember The Everlys' 'Sibling Sound'

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Phil Everly, half of the whole that was the Everly Brothers, died on Friday at the age of 74. The brothers were rock pioneers, and their style, including those close, unmistakable vocal harmonies, influenced a generation of musicians.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WAKE UP LITTLE SUSIE")

THE EVERLY BROTHERS: (Singing) Wake up little Susie, wake up. Wake up little Susie, wake up. We've both been sound asleep. Wake up little Susie and weep...

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Music Interviews
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

A Debut Album At 81 Years Old

Leo Welch's debut album is called Saboulga Voices.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 10:13 am

The new year is a time of new beginnings, new resolutions, new projects and new directions. So it's a perfectly appropriate time of year for Leo Welch, at the age of 81, to put out his very first album.

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The Record
4:24 pm
Sat January 4, 2014

Phil Everly: Harmony To His Brother's Melody

The Everly Brothers, Phil (left) and Don, perform in 2004 in London.
Jo Hale Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 4, 2014 6:59 pm

The Everly Brothers' close harmonies and smooth guitar licks influenced an entire generation of popular musicians. Don Everly's voice usually handled the melody, but Phil Everly gave the higher accompanying harmony to that melody, and that was what defined The Everly Brothers' sound.

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Music
10:58 am
Sat January 4, 2014

From Springsteen To St. Vincent, A Look At 2014's New Music

Bruce Springsteen.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 4, 2014 5:54 pm

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Music News
7:52 am
Sat January 4, 2014

Hip-Hop's Aboriginal Connection

Two turntables carved from wood scratch out the sound of Beat Nation artist Jordan Bennett learning his native Mi'kmaq language.
David Sommerstein / NCPR

Originally published on Sat January 4, 2014 1:38 pm

At the entrance of a new exhibit at Montreal's Musée d'Art Contemporain, visitors are greeted with a red neon glow and a ping-pong of sounds. A dubstep groove thumps. A high-hat skitters. A pow-wow chant echoes from another room.

Beat Nation: Hip Hop as Indigenous Culture has become something of an art sensation in Canada. Featuring more than two dozen artists using beats, graffiti, humor and politics to challenge stereotypes, the exhibit coincides with the growth of Idle No More, an indigenous political movement in Canada.

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