Music

Deceptive Cadence
3:18 am
Sun October 19, 2014

After 200 Years, A Schubert Song Still Resonates

Scottish-American soprano Mary Garden (1874-1967) portrayed Goethe's character Gretchen, known as Marguerite in Charles Gounod's opera Faust.
Bettmann/CORBIS

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:43 am

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All Songs Considered
7:03 am
Sat October 18, 2014

The Good Listener: How Can I Become A 'Music Person'?

A reader grew up listening to Rick Astley and now needs to know: Is it too late?
Courtesy of the artist

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and alongside the shoes our kids outgrew in the time it took to have them shipped is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, thoughts on remedial music fandom.

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Music Interviews
7:03 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Primus: Music Makers, Dreamer Of Dreams

Primus' new album is titled Primus & The Chocolate Factory.
Chapman Baehler Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 5:24 pm

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Tiny Desk Concerts
5:34 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Ásgeir: Tiny Desk Concert

Susan Hale Thomas NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 4:04 pm

When he was 20, Ásgeir Trausti Einarsson released an album in Iceland, sung in Icelandic, with many of the words written by his father. Dýrð í dauðaþögn became the biggest-selling debut in Icelandic music history.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:18 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Postlude To A Kiss: Scriabin's Raging 'Poem Of Ecstasy'

Alexander Scriabin originally set out to write a piece called "Orgiastic Poem," centered on physical ecstasy, but later decided to alter the title to something more ambiguous.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 2:46 pm

I love composer anniversaries because they afford us opportunities to look at musicians anew, and 2015 will mark the centenary of the death of Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. It's quite possible that you've never heard of Scriabin, but take comfort in the fact that even his biographer said, "No one was more famous during their lifetime, and few were more quickly ignored after death."

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