Music

Mom And Dad's Record Collection
3:11 pm
Thu August 16, 2012

Loving An Album To Death Makes A Music Fan For Life

Little Darrin Wolsko spent a chunk of his childhood playing his father's copy of The Beatles self-titled album, best known as The White Album, over and over.
Courtesy of the Wolsko family

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 5:19 pm

All this summer, All Things Considered is digging into the record collections of listeners' parents to hear about one song introduced by a parent that has stayed with you.

Among the many records Darrin Wolsko spun while donning a red cape around 1985, The Beatles' self-titled release best known as The White Album got the most plays — "to the point where I destroyed the album. I shredded this album to pieces," Wolsko says.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:08 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Checking Opera's Pulse: A Conversation About The State Of The Art

Can opera survive in an era of shrinking budgets and aging audiences?
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:56 pm

  • Hear The 'Future of Opera' Discussion

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Music Reviews
11:06 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Autosalvage: The Psychedelic Band That Vanished

Autosalvage, a New York quartet, made one album and then stopped playing.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 2:14 pm

A little over 10 years ago, a friend with a small record company in England called me and asked if I wanted to do liner notes for an album he was re-releasing. When he told me it was the Autosalvage album, I flipped. Of course I did!

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Favorite Sessions
11:04 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Hot Chip: An Invitation To Sweat

Nate Ryan The Current

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 10:12 am

British band Hot Chip has made a career out of exploring the collision point between heart-rending indie rock, cleverly self-aware pop and spastic, dancefloor-ready beats.

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Music
10:30 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Underground Iranian Band Steps Out Of The Shadows

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 5:45 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Recently, a friend handed me an Iranian music CD and said you have to hear this. My friend is an Iranian filmmaker and once, long ago, he took me to an underground jazz concert in Tehran. It was dramatic traveling through back alleys to get to the gig and I did a story on it for NPR then in 1997.

One of the musicians I met that night was a bass player named Marob(ph). Speaking through a translator, he mentioned the freedom music creates, even in an authoritarian society.

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